Children's Administration, Department of Social and Health Services
Children's Administration, Department of Social and Health Services
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Practices and Procedures Guide

4530. Foster Care

45301. Service Definition

Foster Care is temporary out-of-home care in a family home that is licensed to provide this service. Foster parents are part of the professional team working to complete the permanency plan for the child and his/her family.

45302. Eligibility

  1. Children for whom the department has legal authority to place in out-of-home care are eligible for the service. Legal authority includes a transfer of custody signed by a police officer, a court order, or a voluntary consent signed by the child's parent. See section 4307 of this chapter regarding procedures for Voluntary Placement Agreements. The child must be under the age of 18 unless in school to obtain a high school diploma or equivalent certificate and have been in out-of-home placement on the child's 18th birthday.

45303. Procedures

  1. The social worker determines that appropriate relative care is not available prior to placement of the child in foster care.
  2. The social worker locates and contacts an available, appropriate foster home parent utilizing the locally determined placement system.
  3. The social worker informs the foster parent of CA responsibilities toward finding a relative that is similar and familiar to the child. The social worker assists the foster parent by providing clear information and consultation/resources if needed to care for a particular child.
  4. In instances where placement is not emergent, the social worker must arrange pre-placement visits to reduce the anxiety of the child around the placement and to familiarize the child with his/her temporary family. When possible and appropriate, the social worker must involve parents in preplacement visits. Unless emergency preempts such involvement, the child's social worker must be involved in the pre-placement visits and the actual placement in the foster home. See section 45282, paragraph H, for the requirement to contact the child placed after hours or on weekends within the next few days following placement.
  5. To reduce conflict between CA and foster parents about the temporary nature of foster care, social workers need to be clear at the time of placement, and regularly thereafter, about the long term and permanency plan for the child.
    1. To help the foster parent decide if the foster parent can care for the child, the social worker provides the foster home parent with information about the immediate condition of the child, the child's behaviors, school and medical information, and specifics of the permanency plan that will affect the child and the placement.
    2. The social worker clarifies dates of future visits to the foster home and provides the foster home with written background information and emergency numbers when placing the child. Most regional offices have designated forms for providing information to foster parents. Specific information to be provided to the foster parents includes:
      1. Child's full name, birth date and legal status
      2. Last school of attendance and eligibility for special education and related services
      3. Medical problems/history including name of doctor/ dentist and medical coverage
      4. Name and address of parent/guardian
      5. Reason for placement
      6. Emergency procedures and any special instructions
      7. The name and telephone number of the social worker and of the social worker's immediate supervisor
  6. See section 45282 and the Operations Manual, chapter 11000, for procedures regarding federal funding.
  7. The social worker makes a contact with the foster home within three days following placement to see how the child is adjusting.
  8. The social worker and the licenser encourage foster parents to keep a record of the child's stay in their home, including any medical reports received by the foster parent, significant developmental milestones, behavior, schools attended, names of all medical providers and dates of visits, immunizations, grades/report cards, friends, pets, and pictures of the child.
  9. Whenever possible or appropriate, the social worker provides parents/guardians with information about the child's adjustment, health, and school progress while in foster care.
  10. After the initial contact following placement, the social worker must visit the foster home and have face-to-face contact in the foster home with the foster parents and child every calendar month not to exceed 40 days between visits. The social worker interviews the child to ensure the child's health and safety, to assess the child or foster parent's need for services, and to provide casework support to assist foster parents in caring for the child. When there are problems with a placement, the social worker works with foster parents to find resources for resolving problems. For example, specialized training, consultation, or other support may be needed at particular times with particular placements.
  11. Notice of Court Hearings to Caregivers

    For children who are dependent under chapter 13.34 RCW, the social worker must notify current caregivers of the date of scheduled court proceedings pertaining to the child, and, if known, the court's procedures for the caregiver's right to be heard in court proceedings. Notification of the right to be heard applies to foster parents, pre-adoptive parents, relative caregivers, and other caregivers who are caring for the child at the time of the hearing. This hearing notice does not give the caregiver legal status as a party to the case. The court will make the final decision about whether and how the caregiver will provide input at the hearing.

  12. RCW 13.34.138(1)

    1. CA shall provide caregivers with written notice of the Court hearing at least 10 working days (14 calendar days) prior to regularly scheduled court review hearings related to periodic case reviews and permanency planning for the child currently in their care. Notification shall be provided by certified mail.
    2. If a court review hearing is scheduled to occur within 7 days of being set, CA shall notify the caregivers of the hearing date as soon as it is practical. Notification shall occur by:
      1. Telephone contact; or
      2. Face-to-face contact; or
      3. Email notification; or
      4. Written notification.
    3. Notification of court hearings shall include:
      1. Date, time and place of hearing;
      2. Procedure for providing input at the hearing, if court procedures are known by the social worker.
    4. The social worker shall include a copy of the written notice of the hearing in the correspondence section of the child's case record or if the Court hearing is scheduled to occur within 7 days of being set, the social worker will document notification in a Service Episode Record (SER) in the child's case file.
  13. Notice of Shared Planning Meetings to Caregivers

    For children who are dependent under chapter 13.34 RCW, the social worker must notify current caregivers of the Shared Planning Meetings convened by CA pertaining to the safety, permanence and well-being of the child in their care. This right to notice applies to foster parents, pre-adoptive parents and relatives who are caring for the child at the time of the Shared Planning Meeting.

    1. CA shall provide as much advance notice to caregivers as possible, no later than 5 days before the scheduled meeting. For more emergent staffings, notice will be given to participants as soon as possible.
    2. CA shall provide caregivers with notice of the Shared Planning Meetings regarding the child currently in their care. Notification will occur by:
      1. Telephone contact; or
      2. Face-to-face contact; or
      3. Email notification; or
      4. Written notification.
    3. Notification of Shared Planning Meetings shall include:
      1. Date, time and place of the meeting;
      2. Nature of the meeting; and
      3. Process for providing input at the meeting.
    4. If the caregiver is unable to participate in the shared planning meeting, CA shall request a written report from the caregiver and present the caregiver perspective.
    5. The social worker will document notification in a Service Episode Record (SER) in the child's case file or place a copy of the written notification in the child's file.
  14. When the child's social worker has a specific concern or complaint regarding a foster home, the worker conveys the concerns in writing to the foster care licenser for that home. When the complaint is an allegation of CA/N, the social worker shall make a CPS referral.
  15. Notification to Foster Parents When Moving a Child
    1. When a child has been placed in a foster family home and has then resided in the home for at least 90 consecutive days, the social worker shall notify the foster family at least five days prior to moving the child to another placement, unless one of the following applies:
      1. A court order has been entered requiring an immediate change in placement.
      2. The child is being returned home.
      3. The child's safety is in jeopardy.
      4. The child is residing in a receiving home or a group/ rehabilitative care facility.
    2. If a child has resided in a foster family home for less than 90 days or if, due to one or more of the circumstances above, it is not possible to give five days notification, the social worker shall notify the foster family home of proposed placement changes as soon as reasonably possible.
  16. If the dependency or tribal guardian chooses to receive foster care payments rather than SSI payments or other cited source in behalf of the child, the assigned staff establishes a trust account with the Trust Fund Unit to be used to meet the cost of care or special needs of the child in accordance with RCW 74.13.060. See the Operations Manual, chapter 11000, section 11800, for details on establishment of a trust fund.
  17. For a youth 18 through 20 years of age to continue in foster care beyond the youth's 18th birthday see 43071 Voluntary Plan for Continued Placement and Services for Youth (ages 18 to 21) policy.
  18. A developmentally disabled youth age 18 through 20 may continue in DCFS supported care until the day before the day the youth reaches age 21 in accordance with the intra-agency agreement with the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD). If a DDD-eligible youth has a placement or education plan disruption during this extended eligibility, DDD assumes responsibility for the youth.
  19. See section 45283 for information regarding TANF maintenance for the child's family.

4531. Private Child Placing Agencies

  1. Purpose

    This policy outlines definitions and the requirements for use of in-state private Child Placing Agencies (CPA) for the following services:

    • Case Management
    • Parent-Child Visits
    • Intensive Case Management
    • Borrowed-Home
    • Follow-Up Services
    • Case Aide Services
  2. Child Placing Agency Services Definition and Eligibility Requirements
  3. Children in the custody of DSHS-CA placed in a Child Placing Agency foster home may receive one or more of the following services:

    1. Case Management
    2. Definition - Targeted Case Management Services provided by the Child Placing Agency. Case Management Services include coordinating or providing services to enable the child and caregivers to utilize medical, educational, social, and other services necessary for maintaining the child's physical, psychological, and/or developmental health. Responsibilities of the CPA include:

      • Obtain initial and on-going medical screens under the published guidelines for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program.
      • Ensure the child and caregiver participate in scheduled Child Health and Education Track (CHET) screens.
      • In conjunction with CA, develop a plan for follow up on medical, dental, mental health or substance abuse issues identified through either the EPSDT evaluation, the CHET screen or other assessment procedures.
      • Work with education advocacy coordinators as available for services to school age children.
      • Assist with the development and implementation of Individualized Education Plans (IEP) as needed.
      • Monitor progress of school age children who are enrolled in school.
      • Assist in keeping the child's school placement stable while in foster care. Provide support to children and caregivers to assist the child(ren) in making yearly academic progress.
      • Implement recommendations for age appropriate socialization or developmental remediation for services to pre-school children (i.e. enroll in developmental pre-school, Head Start/Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP), Early Support for Infants and Toddlers (ESIT).
      • Recognize culturally unique needs of each child and in conjunction with CA develop and implement a shared plan to maintain the connection between the child and his or her culture
      • Assess and identify child strengths and talents and consider opportunities for the child to pursue those interests when developing shared plans.
      • Support the foster parent in having contact with the birth parent, when appropriate, as determined by case manager or DCFS social worker.
      • Offer youth age fourteen and over, appropriate opportunities for the youth to begin to acquire the skills necessary for a successful transition to adulthood.
      • Refer eligible youth age 15 and over to Contracted IL services if available and appropriate.
      • Support the ILS plan and services, as age appropriate.
      • In conjunction with CA, ensure the Ansel-Casey Life Skills Assessment (ACLSA) is completed on all youth fifteen years (15) and older.
      • Appear in court to testify as requested by CA
      • Attend shared planning meetings as arranged or scheduled by CA.
      • Arrange shared planning meetings as appropriate.
      • Conduct 90-day Health and Safety visits.

      Eligibility - The social worker and the supervisor will determine if case management services are appropriate when a child is placed in a private agency home. Individual offices may create internal guidelines to determine when to use private agency case management services.

    3. Parent-Child Visits
    4. Definition - Transportation and visitation supervision services for children in placement.

      Eligibility - All Children receiving Case Management services are eligible for weekly parent-child visits conducted by the Child Placing Agency.

    5. Intensive Case Management
    6. Definition - Intensive Case Management (ICM) is the additional support provided to children receiving case management services when extensive coordination of services is required. Services requiring extensive coordination may include:

      • Behavior that requires intensive supervision
      • Case Aide Services
      • Mental health, medical, substance abuse or other therapeutic services
      • In-home modeling, training and support for a caregiver to manage challenging behaviors
      • Supports to stabilize placement and prevent disruption

      Note - ICM services may be requested by CA or by the Child Placing Agency if there is a need for more intensive case management.

      Eligibility - A child is eligible for time limited ICM services when receiving basic case management services from a contracted Child Placing Agency and one of the following applies:

      1. The child has been in a Behavioral Rehabilitative Services (BRS) placement for a minimum of three (3) months and is "graduating" from a BRS placement and in need of Intensive Case Management.
      2. The child's case requires extensive coordination of service.

      This is determined on a case-by-case basis. See referral procedures for more information.

    7. Borrowed-Home Services
    8. Definition - Children's Administration (CA) borrows a foster home/bed from a Child Placing Agency.

      Eligibility - A child is eligible for Borrowed-Home services when the child is placed in a Child Placing Agency home and case management services are provided by CA.

      CA only pays the private agency to maintain the foster care license and provide any related licensing services. This service also covers maintenance of a foster care license for foster parent guardianships in a private agency home.

    9. Follow-Up Services
    10. Definition - Follow-up care services are case management services provided by the Child Placing Agency after the child has left the CPA foster home.

      Eligibility - A child is eligible for Follow-Up Services when the child has moved out of Child Placing Agency foster care and returned home, in relative care, or in extended family/non-relative care and the private agency agrees to continue case management services to the child. Follow-up Services may be provided for up to six months.

    11. Case Aide Services
    12. Definition - Case aide services are used to meet supervision and monitoring requirements for children in foster care. Case Aide (case aide) Services are intended to augment supervision and activity plans for children whose behaviors or developmental needs cannot be managed in a foster home without additional assistance.

      Case Aide Services must not be used when respite or childcare services are more appropriate.

      Eligibility - Case Aide services are for children with behaviors that require intense one-on-one supervision.

  4. Social Worker Responsibilities
    1. Referral to Child Placing Agency
      1. When making a referral to the Child Placing Agencies social workers must use the Child Placing Agency Referral Form (DSHS 10-402 this replaces the 15-190); the Child Information/Placement Referral Form (15- 300) and the Parent-Child Visit Plan form (15-209C).
      2. Emergency Placements - If the CA social worker is unable to make a written referral prior to placement, the social worker will complete the referral within five (5) calendar days of placement.
      3. Timeframe for Post Referral Follow up - The CA worker must contact the Child Placing Agency worker within one week of the referral and discuss required case management services, coordination, roles, and responsibilities.
      4. Additional referral requirements related to specific services include:

        Referral for Parent-Child Visits.
        The completed visit plan (15-209C) must be attached to the referral.

        Requests/Referral for Intensive Case Management. (ICM)
        The social worker must ensure all requests received from or for the Child Placing Agency for ICM services include:

        • Child's name
        • Intended length of ICM service
        • Reason(s) for ICM services
        • Description of ICM services above regular case management
        • Additional number of case management hours expected
        • Level of ICM requested ($200 or $400)

        If the referral for ICM is not complete, the social worker must immediately return the referral to the Child Placing Agency with the reason(s) it was not accepted.

        When the social worker receives or makes a request for ICM services, the social worker must obtain supervisory approval and forward the ICM request to the Regional Gatekeeper within five (5) days.

    2. Authorization ICM Regional Gatekeeper Responsibilities
    3. The ICM Regional Gatekeeper will have an additional five (5) days, for a total of ten (10) working days to review and approve or deny the request.

      If the request is denied, the ICM Regional Gatekeeper will return the request to the social worker with a statement citing the reason(s) for denial.

      This approval process may be done via e-mail. The social worker must use the e-mail as the approval or denial of the request and document the activities in the case file.

      The Regional Gatekeeper must track all requests and the decision of each request and reason for approval or denial.

    4. Follow-up Care Services. Follow-up care services are limited to six months. Requests for extensions must be in writing and approved by the CA Regional Administrator or designee.
    5. Monitoring
    6. The CA social worker is expected to monitor CPA placements in the following ways:

      1. Review quarterly progress reports from the CPA regarding the child. The CA social worker may return any CPA quarterly report that does not meet the expectations of CA. The social worker shall send a letter outlining the concerns to the CPA with copies to the regional office licenser and contracts coordinator.
      2. Inform the regional licenser and contracts manager if there are on-going problems with reports or reason to believe that the health and safety of children in a CPA home is jeopardized.
      3. Visit with the child and caregiver as outlined in Monthly Social Worker Visit policy in section 4420 of Practices and Procedures manual 4000.

4532. Therapeutic Or Treatment Foster Care

45321. Service Definition

  1. Therapeutic or treatment foster homes are those licensed foster families that have been identified to care for extremely behaviorally/emotionally disturbed children who cannot function in a family home without specialized treatment and expertise.
  2. Therapeutic foster parents have specialized skills in managing these children. Often these homes have a pre-determined, designated intensive "package" of services that are delivered to every child placed in the therapeutic foster home.
  3. Therapeutic foster care is provided directly through DCFS licensed foster homes and by contract or agreement with other agencies. These services do not include those accessed through Rehabilitative Treatment Services described in section 4533, following. If Treatment Foster Care is provided through a Rehabilitation Treatment Services contract, see section 4533 for provisions for access and management.

45322. Eligibility

Eligibility is determined, in accordance with regional procedures, following assessment of service and placement options.

45323. Procedures for Access

  1. The social worker determines that appropriate relative care is not available prior to placement of the child in foster care.
  2. The social worker locates and contacts an available, appropriate foster home parent utilizing the locally determined placement system.
  3. The social worker informs the foster parent of DCFS responsibilities toward finding a relative that is similar and familiar to the child. The social worker assists the foster parent by providing clear information and consultation/resources if needed to care for a particular child.
  4. In instances where placement is not emergent, the social worker must arrange pre-placement visits to reduce the anxiety of the child around the placement and to familiarize the child with the child's temporary family. When possible and appropriate, the social worker must involve parents in pre-placement visits. Unless emergency preempts such involvement, the child's social worker must be involved in the pre- placement visits and the actual placement in the foster home. See section 45282, paragraph H, for the requirement to contact the child placed after hours or on weekends within the next few days following placement.
  5. To reduce conflict between DCFS and foster parents about the temporary nature of foster care, social workers need to be clear at the time of placement, and regularly thereafter, about the long term and permanency plan for the child.
    1. To help the foster parent decide if they can care for the child, the social worker provides the foster home parent with information about the immediate condition of the child, the child's behaviors, school and medical information, and specifics of the permanency plan that will affect the child and the placement. See the Case Services Policy Manual, chapter 4000, section 4120, paragraph A, for requirements to disclose information regarding HIV infection and sexually transmitted diseases to the residential care provider for the child who is less than 14 years of age.
    2. The social worker clarifies dates of future visits to the foster home and provides the foster home with written background information and emergency numbers when placing the child. Most regional offices have designated forms for providing information to foster parents. Specific information to be provided to the foster parents includes:
      1. Child's full name, birth date, and legal status.
      2. Last school of attendance and eligibility for special education and related services.
      3. Medical problems/history including name of doctor/ dentist and medical coverage.
      4. Name and address of parent/guardian.
      5. Reason for placement.
      6. Emergency procedures and any special instructions.
      7. The name and telephone number of the social worker and of the social worker's immediate supervisor.
  6. See section 45282 for procedures regarding federal funding.
  7. The social worker makes a contact with the foster home within three days following placement to see how the child is adjusting.
  8. The social worker and the licenser encourage foster parents to keep a record of the child's stay in their home, including any medical reports received by the foster parent, significant developmental milestones, behavior, schools attended, names of all medical providers and dates of visits, grades/report cards, friends, pets, and pictures of the child.
  9. Whenever possible or appropriate, the social worker must provide parents/guardians with information about the child's adjustment, health, and school progress while in foster care.
  10. After the initial contact following placement, the social worker must visit the foster home and have face-to-face contact in the foster home with the foster parents and child every calendar month not to exceed 40 days between visits. The social worker conducts these on-site interviews to ensure the health and safety of the child, to assess the child's adjustment to placement, to assess services needed by the child or foster parent, and to provide casework support to assist foster parents in caring for the child. The social worker must document the activities in the case SER. When there are problems with a placement, the social worker works with foster parents to find resources for resolving problems. For example, specialized training, consultation, or other support may be needed at particular times with particular placements.
  11. For children who are dependent under chapter 13.34 RCW, the social worker must notify the current caregiver of the date of scheduled court review hearings pertaining to the child. The social worker almost notify the caregiver of the caregiver's right to an opportunity to be heard in the review hearing and to provide the court with information. This right to notice of hearings and opportunity to be heard applies to foster parents, pre-adoptive parents, and relatives who are caring for the child at the time of the hearing. This hearing notice does not give the caregiver legal status as a party to the case. The court will make the final decision about whether and how the caregiver will provide input at the hearing.
  12. When the child's social worker has a specific concern or complaint regarding a foster home, the worker conveys the concerns in writing to the foster care licenser for that home. When the complaint is an allegation of CA/N, the social worker shall make a CPS referral.
  13. When a child is to be removed from a foster home, the social worker shall send five-day written notice to the foster parent prior to the date of the child's move unless a court order or concern for the child's health and safety requires that the child be moved immediately.
  14. Procedures for contracted or other types of therapeutic foster care vary, depending on the contract or agreement with DCFS. The social worker consults their supervisor, the special placements coordinator, or home finder, and regional procedures for specific guidelines.

4533. Behavioral Rehabilitation Services

Approval: Jennifer Strus, Asst. Secretary

Effective Date: September 27, 1995

Revised Date: July 1, 2014

Sunset Review: June 30, 2018


Purpose

Behavior Rehabilitation Services (BRS) is a temporary intensive wraparound support and treatment program for youth with high-level service needs. BRS is used to stabilize youth (in-home or out-of-home) and assist in achieving their permanent plan.

BRS services are intended to:

  • Safely keep youth in their own homes with wraparound supports to the family
  • Safely reunify or achieve alternative permanency more quickly
  • Safely meet the needs of youth in family- based care to prevent the need for placement into a more restrictive setting
  • Safely reduce length of service by transitioning youth to a permanent home or less intensive service

Laws

RCW 13.34.100

WAC 388-25-0100

Policy

  1. Youth with high-level complex service needs are eligible for Behavioral Rehabilitation Services (BRS) when they meet specific BRS criteria.
  2. All youth must be referred to an RSN/local county mental health provider for a Wraparound Intensive Services (WISe) screen, when services are available in the county of referring CA staff, prior to BRS referral and approval.
  3. Youth can only receive BRS from contracted BRS service providers.
  4. The youth's CA worker must participate in BRS Child and Family Team (CFT) meetings which must include the provider, youth, community partners, and others identified by the family.
  5. The youth's CA worker will facilitate the discussion to identify a targeted discharge date and transition placement during the initial CFT meeting.
  6. BRS services that last longer than 12 months or past the age of 18 years requires approval to assure the barriers preventing the youth from transitioning out of BRS are addressed.
  7. If the youth requires out of state BRS, follow 4266 Out-of-State Placements policy.

Procedures

  1. Eligibility and Referral

    The Social Worker will:

    1. Consult with the Regional BRS Manager to determine if a BRS referral is needed or appropriate for the youth. If BRS Manager agrees, complete the referral process as follows:
      1. Refer youth to the RSN/local county mental health provider for a WISe screen (when available in the county of origin). Once screening has been completed:
        • Request a copy of the WISe screen from the county mental health provider and include a copy in the BRS referral packet.
        • If a hard copy of WISe screen result is not available, document the results on the BRS Referral form (DSHS 10-166a).
        • If a WISe screen was requested, but not completed by the RSN/local county mental health provider, document this fact on BRS Referral form (DSHS 10-166a).
        • Document in case notes when a WISe referral is made and the results of WISe screenings.
      2. Identify needed supports and services for the youth and family during a Family Team Decision Making (FTDM) or Shared Planning Meeting held before a BRS referral is made.
      3. Complete a BRS referral form and packet when the FTDM or Shared Planning Meeting team indicates the youth would benefit from BRS.
      4. Obtain supervisor and Area Administrator approval before sending the referral packet to the regional BRS Manager.
    2. The Regional BRS Manager will:

      1. Review referral packet.
      2. Verify that a WISe screen referral was made or results are included in the referral packet. If a screen was not completed, ensure that that the worker documented on the BRS referral form (DSHS 10-166a) that the screen was requested, but not completed, and the date referral was made. Approval for BRS must not be granted without this information in counties where WISe has been implemented.
      3. Determine youth's eligibility for BRS and review youth's discharge and or permanency plan.
      4. Send referral packet and negotiate the service level needed with the contracted service provider.
      5. Notify CA worker of the provider, service level and contracted rate once provider has been determined.
      6. When the youth's needs exceed the BRS level of care:
        1. Consult with CA HQ Intensive Resource Manager.
        2. Negotiate with potential in-state agencies regarding an Intensive Residential Child Specific wraparound service contract and obtain Regional Administrator or designee approval.
        3. Work with Regional Contract Manager to initiate the Child Specific contract if approved. DSHS 10-490 form must be completed by the potential contractor per instructions included in the form. This document must be included with the contract approval request.
        4. Follow Policy 4266 Out-of-State Placements if youth requires out of state Intensive Residential Child Specific contracted services. DSHS 10-490 form must be completed.
      7. Obtain approval from the receiving BRS manager when out-of-region BRS is needed.
    3. The Service Period (In-home or out-of-home)

      The CA Worker will:

      1. Document service type, placement (if needed) and payment in the electronic case file.
      2. Participate in all CFT meetings. Actively involve youth, youth's family and other identified supports in case planning. The meeting will focus on the youth's transition to a less intensive service or a permanent home.

        Important: CFT meetings are usually held in the family's community and include the following people:

        Youth, parents/caregivers, family members, community members, mental health professionals, educators, and other individuals agreed upon by the family.

      3. Focus CFT meetings on measurable outcomes related to safety, stability, permanency and discharge planning for the youth.
      4. During quarterly case reviews with the BRS Contractor:
        1. Discuss WISe screen results
        2. Review progress and discharge reports from the contractor (WISe screen results should be included). BRS Contractors are required to refer youth to the RSN/local county mental health provider for a WISe screen (when available in the county of origin) at least every six months and prior to discharge.
        3. Document the results of case review in case notes.
      5. Share information with the youth in accordance with the disclosure policy. Share information with the dependent youth about the court processes and their right to legal representation according to RCW 13.34.100
      6. Assist youth 15 and older who are in out-of-home care for more than 30 days in completing the Ansell-Casey Life Skills Assessment (ACLSA) and Learning Plan (LP) per the 43102 CA Responsibilities to Youth 12 and Older policy.
      7. Complete a personalized, youth directed Transition Plan for youth age 17.5 as required per the the 43104 Transition Planning for Dependent Youth 15-18 Years policy.
      8. Obtain written approval from the RA or designee to extend BRS when barriers exist that prevents the youth transitioning out of BRS within 12 months. Approval must be obtained prior to the 12th month and every six months thereafter. A copy of the written approval must be sent to Regional BRS manager.
      9. Obtain written approval from the RA or designee, to extend BRS when barriers exist that prevents the youth transitioning out of BRS by the age of 18. Approval must be obtained prior to the youth's 18th birthday and every six months thereafter. A copy of the written approval must be sent to Regional BRS manager.
      10. Complete the Voluntary Plan for continued placement per the 4307 Voluntary Placement Agreement Policy with youth approved for extended BRS.

      Regional BRS Manager will:

      1. Provide oversight, guidance, consultation regarding BRS contractor's compliance. Including quality of service, outcomes and performance.
      2. Monitor and track regional BRS data, including but not limited to, date of entry, exit, length of stay, placement type, service and rate.
      3. Review every six months, the youth's service needs, level of care, target exit date, and transition plan in collaboration with the social worker and contracted service provider.
      4. Participate in CFT meetings when possible.
    4. Aftercare (Out-of-home BRS)

      The CA Worker will:

      1. Participate in all CFT meetings to discuss after care wraparound planning that supports the youth and family to achieve stability, permanency or placement transition.

      Regional BRS Manager will:

      1. Consult with the social worker to develop an aftercare service plan.
      2. Negotiate with the contracted provider on an aftercare service plan.

    Forms and Tools

    • Behavioral Rehabilitation Services Referral Form (DSHS 10-166a)
    • Child Specific Contract Rate Proposal Form (DSHS 10-490)
    • BRS Screening Guide

    4534. Crisis Residential Center (CRC) Program

    1. PURPOSE
    2. To ensure all CRC placements are a short-term, temporary placement option available on a 24-hour, 7 day-a-week basis to youth missing from home or care and youth in serious conflict with parents or guardians. Stays in CRC placements should only be as long as needed to transition the youth to parents, guardians, relatives, or other stable family. All CRC placements:

      • Minimize the time a youth spends in a crisis placement
      • Support the stabilization of a youth's behaviors
      • Focus on the youth's current behaviors to identify the youth's needs for further assessment or services
      • Support reunification with the family or transition to another safe placement
    3. POLICY
      1. Within 24 hours of placement, excluding weekends and holidays, the CA social worker will contact the youth.
      2. If the youth is enrolled or eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, the social worker will notify the tribe of the youth's placement as indicated in the Indian Child Welfare Manual.
      3. Within 72 hours of placement, excluding weekends and holidays, the CA social worker will:
        1. Identify a dependent youth's discharge placement or have scheduled a Family Team Decision Making (FTDM) or Shared Planning meeting.
        2. For a nondependent youth:
          1. Offer voluntary FRS services to the youth and family,
          2. Coordinate family reconciliation efforts, and
          3. Obtain legal authorization for placements lasting longer than 72 hours, which includes:
            1. Parental consent between the CRC and parent or legal guardian with CA approval for youth to continue placement with the agreed goal of reunification within 7 calendar days.
              1. Exceptions to this timeframe must be approved on a case by case basis by the Regional Administrator or designee.
            2. Shelter care order
            3. The filing a Child in Need or Service petition, or
            4. Voluntary placement agreement developed according to the VPA policy.
      4. Within 5 days of the youth's discharge placement being identified, the social worker will transition the youth to that placement.
      5. The CRC will discharge all youth to parent(s) or legal guardian or CA when the maximum placement is reached (5 consecutive days for detention secure CRCs and 15 consecutive days for non-detention based secure CRCs and semi secure CRCs).
    4. PROCEDURE
      1. CRC regionally designated Gatekeeper will ensure placements meet program criteria:
        1. Youth, ages 12 to 17 years old, eligible for placement in family or semisecure CRC are those youth who are:
          1. Runaways,
          2. Missing from care,
          3. In conflict with their family, or
          4. In need of emergency placement.
          5. Sexually Exploited Youth (See Appendix A for definition)
      2. CRC regionally designated Gatekeeper will ensure placements are as brief as possible and all placements end before the maximum length of stay is exceeded.
      3. Social worker will:
        1. Authorize any needed emergency medical or dental care only for dependent youth or youth placed through a VPA. Medical or dental care authorization for youth placed by Parental Consent must be given by the parent or legal guardian.
        2. Coordinate with CPS investigative social worker if there CPS allegations.
        3. Assist family in obtaining appropriate services.
    5. DEFINITION
    6. There are four types of CRC facilities utilized for placements.

      1. Family CRC is located in a licensed foster home.
      2. Semi-secure CRC is a facility with no locking doors or windows.
      3. Secure CRC not co-located within a juvenile detention center has secure perimeter fencing or time delayed doors to prevent exit.
      4. Secure CRC co-located within a juvenile detention center is a physically secure facility (internal locking doors and windows).

    4535. PERMANENCY PLANNING FAMILY PLACEMENT (PPFP)

    1. Purpose of a PPFP
      1. This policy establishes guidelines for CA staff to place children in an appropriate foster home to ensure the best interest of the child and to begin permanency planning during the early stages of dependency.
      2. The policy provides a secure and stable attachment to adults acting in a parental capacity that is essential for children. In order to promote appropriate attachments during the dependency process, it is beneficial to children to be placed in a home that has the potential for permanency if the child is not returned to his/her birth parents. Families willing to make permanent commitments to children, while understanding the child may be returned to his/her birth parents, are called Permanency Planning Family Placements (PPFPs).
      3. In order to be considered a PPFP, the family must understand the dependency process, be aware of the child's family situation, and support reunification efforts. This requires pre-service training, support for the PPFP family, and information sharing with the family.

    45351. Definition

    1. A PPFP is one that is approved to care for the child on a temporary basis (relative or foster parent) and has an approved adoptive home study so that the PPFP can be considered as an adoptive placement for the child, in the event that parental rights are terminated. If the child cannot be returned to his or her birth parents, the intention of the department and the family is that the family will adopt the child. The family is prepared to be partners with the department and the child's birth family in concurrent planning for the child.
    2. PPFPs are licensed foster families or relatives who are approved to care for the child. All statutory, regulatory, and procedural guidance apply to PPFPs as they do to all foster parents and relative caregivers. All departmental policies and procedures related to social worker involvement with foster parents and relative caregivers also apply to PPFPs.

    45352. PROCEDURES

    Prior to implementation of this policy and procedure, each Children's Administration region is responsible to define and implement the specific procedures required for identifying PPFPs, identifying children appropriate for placement with a PPFP, and making placements. The regional procedures shall be consistent with this, and other, CA policies and procedures.

    1. Identification of Families Appropriate for the Permanency Planning Family Program
      1. A Permanency Planning Family (PPFP) is a family that is approved to care for the child on a temporary basis, has an approved foster care license or relative home study, and has an approved adoptive home study.
      2. PPFPs will receive training in the dependency process, concurrent planning, the needs of children for secure attachments and continuity of relationships, and the needs of children for continued contact with their birth family and others with whom they have relationships. This training has been included since the adoption of the PRIDE curriculum. If a family has not taken training since the PRIDE curriculum was introduced, the region must develop a protocol to offer training options. Some options are for specialized training, attending certain sections of PRIDE training that covers the dependency process, concurrent planning, and other training defined in this section.
      3. PPFPs agree to meet the biological family of the child and to support visitation with parents during the dependency process. PPFPs also agree to facilitate on-going contact between the child and the child's siblings, extended family and others with whom the child has positive relationships as appropriate for the child before and after adoption. The safety parameters of these contacts will be discussed with the social worker that will include safeguards to protect the PPFP and the child. In some cases, children and families will not be safe if the biological parent meets the PPFP, even if on a first-name basis in a neutral setting. In-person contact will not be required in those circumstances.
    2. Identification of Children Appropriate for Placement with a Permanency Planning Family
      1. Each DCFS region will establish procedures for review of the appropriateness of a child's placement in a PPFP. Prior to placement in a PPFP, a staffing will occur that must include representation beyond the assigned social worker and supervisor. The licensor, placement coordinator, and social workers for other children in the home should be invited to attend the staffing or, if they are unable to attend, to provide written input. This staffing can occur in a variety of settings (such as prognostic, permanency planning, placement committee, LICWAC, Family Group Conferences, CPTs, Pre-Passport staffings, etc.) depending upon the organization of individual offices and the nature of the case.
      2. The DCFS region will establish procedures that insure case plans will be reviewed from the earliest opportunity for appropriateness of placement with a PPFP. Placement in a PPFP may occur prior to a finding of dependency where it is highly likely the child will require adoptive placement (including when there are aggravated circumstances or extremely poor prognosis for reunification).
      3. Factors to be addressed at the staffing include:
        1. Results of the diligent relative search and discussion with relatives about the child's situation, placement needs, and other relatives who might be placement resources for the child;
        2. Attempts to establish paternity;
        3. Indian Child Welfare (ICW) status;
        4. An assessment of the family situation and history including strengths and deficits that indicate the prognosis for reunification (it is recommended that established tools be used for this assessment such as those found in the publication Concurrent Planning: From Permanency Planning to Permanency Action ;
        5. Current legal status;
        6. Plans to support the continuity of relationships with people who are important to the child and contribute to the child's healthy development;
        7. Special needs of the child;
        8. Review of the current placement as a possible permanency placement that would include a referral for an AHS; and
        9. Ability of proposed PPFP to meet needs of child and work with the family.
      4. Prior to placement of an Indian child (all definitions of Indian Child included in the ICW Manual, Chapter 3.05) with a PPFP, the social worker will staff the child's situation and needs with the child's Tribe, or LICWAC if the tribe has not intervened. The PPFP must be chosen within placement preferences and in compliance with the Indian Child Welfare Manual.
    3. Procedures For Placing Children In Permanency Planning Families
      1. Prior to placement of a child with a PPFP, the social worker will make all attempts to determine paternity. In addition to interviews with the mother and relatives and review of the birth certificate, a review of the Division of Child Support's management information system (SEMS) will be made to determine if the Division of Child Support has determined paternity of the child.
      2. Prior to choosing a placement for the child, parental input on placement preferences will be considered (see the Case Services Policy Manual, section 5762 (G.2.).).
      3. Prior to placement of a child with a PPFP, a relative search will be completed and documented. Documentation will include the names of relatives identified, attempts made to contact them, and discussions with them concerning placement of the child. The relative search may identify an appropriate family member, or a member of the family's support circle, as the PPFP. These identified families should be given preference for placement if the placement is in the child's best interest and the relative is qualified, able to meet the needs of the child, able to assist with reunification efforts, and willing to be a permanent placement if necessary.
      4. If placement in a non-related family home occurs, all identified relatives will either be unreachable, unavailable to meet the responsibilities and commitment expected of a PPFP, ruled out for placement or will have declined placement of the child. Those declining placement of the child will be confirmed in writing, and they will be informed that this decision is anticipated to be final (see sample letter).
      5. The social worker will request a home study through the Interstate Compact (ICPC) process for relatives identified as possible appropriate placements, who are able to meet the responsibilities and commitment expected of a PPFP, and who reside out-of-state. The ICPC may include a request that the family is evaluated for both the child's current placement needs as well as a possible permanency family If the ICPC process significantly delays the child's placement, it may be possible, in consultation with the ICPC program manager, to contract for a child placing agency to conduct the home study.
      6. Prior to placement in the PPFP, the child's social worker will staff the child's situation with the child's Tribe and/or LICWAC (see the ICW Manual Chapter 10.02 to determine when it is appropriate to staff with LICWAC) and obtain approval for the placement. The role of the PPFP will be thoroughly explained to the Tribal representative. If the tribe does not give approval for placement in a PPFP, then the placement will not be made.
      7. Prior to placement in the PPFP, the child's social worker will thoroughly review with the PPFP:
        • the child's birth family situation;
        • the child's special needs;
        • the child's cultural needs;
        • current legal status;
        • case plan;
        • visitation plan;
        • relationships with siblings and extended family with the PPFP;;;
        • the possibility that the child will be returned to the birth parents; and
        • financial considerations-if adoption is the long term plan, foster care support will end when the adoption is finalized. Adoption support is only available to families approved for adoption support prior to adoption finalization.
        Note: This conversation will be documented in the child's file.

        Before placement of a child into a PPFP the family shall sign the DSHS 15-175 Permanency Planning Placement Agreement. The PPFP may choose to review this agreement with their attorney.

      8. The social worker will explain to the birth parents, GAL/CASA and their attorneys the role of the PPFP and share with them the agreement signed by the family with identifying information redacted.
      9. The social worker and the PPFP will arrange with the current placement resource an appropriate transition of the child to placement in the PPFP that takes into consideration the child's age, developmental level, strength of primary attachments, etc.
    4. On-Going Support Of PPFP Placements
      1. DCFS Regions will establish on-going support to PPFPs. This may include:
        1. Agency/staff support of foster parent associations, specifically supporting PPFPs;
        2. Use of FPAWS and foster parent liaisons to assist in communication with foster parents;
        3. Support groups for PPFPs;
        4. Mentor programs for PPFPs, connecting experienced foster parents who have adopted with new PPFPs;
        5. Notification and reminders of the availability of foster parent liaisons and other trouble-shooting procedures;
        6. Communication (written/verbal) that DCFS wants to know if they have concerns about the case plan or their interactions with the birth family or DCFS staff;
        7. Provision of in-service training with PPFPs after placement of children. This would be an extension of the pre-service training sessions and include information on working with the attachment needs of children, interactions with birth families, and working with the system; and
        8. Quarterly meetings for PPFPs to interface with agency staff for feedback, information sharing, and support.
    5. In each visit to the PPFP (including the 90-day health and safety visits), the social worker will share the progress of the parents and the case plan of the department.
    6. The social worker will share all ISSPs with the PPFP, invite them to attend court hearings to provide information to the Court concerning the progress of the child, and share with them the results of all court hearings. The child's PPFP should also be invited to case staffings (LICWAC, CPT, prognostic, permanency, etc.) to provide information on the child and work with the birth family.
    7. If a petition to terminate parental rights is filed, the PPFP family is not a party to the termination proceedings, but is a party in discussions concerning open communication agreements with the child's birth family. The social worker will advise the PPFP that they may want to be represented by their attorney during the discussions and drafting of the agreement.
    8. A PPFP foster parent will only be considered a prospective adoptive parent by the department when the following has occurred:
      1. Parental rights to the child have been terminated;
      2. The department plan for the child is adoption by the PPFP;
      3. The Tribe (or LICWAC, in the absence of tribal intervention), has given approval for the adoption of the child by the PPFP;
      4. The Department has completed and approved an adoptive home study; and
      5. Information on the child has been shared in accordance with Practices and Procedure Guide section 5361.

    45353. Services to the Child

    1. The social worker furnishes all available services normally provided to children in foster care placements to children in foster-adopt or permanency placements. This includes all services aimed at reunifying the child with the parents.
    2. The social worker and supervisor must have permanency planning staffings for children for whom foster-adopt placements are being considered. If there is a change in permanency planning goals, they will hold another permanency planning staffing.

    45354. Services to Family of Origin

    1. The social worker gives the family the opportunity to share information regarding relatives who might be appropriate placement options for their child(ren), both at the time of placement and throughout the life of the case.
    2. When no appropriate relative is found for a placement option, the social worker gives serious consideration to the requests of the parent(s) regarding religious or other general characteristics when choosing the foster-adoptive family, provided the worker has determined that the request is in the best interest of the child.
    3. The social worker informs the birth family regarding their roles and responsibilities and gives detailed explanations regarding visitation and their interaction with the foster-adoptive parents.
    4. The social worker informs the family that, under no circumstances, shall placement with a foster-adopt family curtail their right to reunify with their child if timely progress can be made in the service plan which enables the parent to meet minimum parenting standards.

    45355. Services to the Foster-Adoptive Family

    1. In addition to pre-service training provided to foster and adoptive families, the social worker provides foster-adoptive families with information or training regarding the following topics:
      1. The court process, dependency and termination proceedings, statutes, and appeals.
      2. Bonding and attachment and separation and loss.
      3. Interaction with the child's family.
      4. Confidentiality.
      5. Impact of placement on the foster-adoptive family.
      6. Adoption as a lifelong process and commitment.
    2. The social worker informs the foster-adoptive family of their roles, responsibilities as part of the out-of-home placement team, and the consequences of their actions until the child becomes legally free.
    3. Before placement of a child into the foster-adoptive home, the social worker informs the family of the case situation and the results of the permanency planning staffing. See section 43052.
    4. Before placement of a child into the foster-adoptive home, the family shall sign a Permanency Planning Placement Agreement, DSHS 15-175, acknowledging the potential of the child's move to another home or return home and the continued requirements for the provision of reunification services.
    5. The foster parent formally becomes a prospective adoptive parent when the child becomes legally free and the foster parent has made a formal written statement of their objective intent to accept placement of a child for adoption. The foster parent retains the right to withdraw from the adoption before finalization of the adoption.
    6. Immediately upon the foster parent formally becoming a prospective adoptive parent, the social worker shall provide complete information on the child and its family of origin as outlined in chapter 5000, section 5361.

    4536. Sexually Aggressive Youth and Physically Assaultive/Aggressive Youth

    45361. Sexually Aggressive Youth

    Purpose Statement To guide CA social workers in properly identifying Sexually Aggressive Youth (SAY) and provide the needed supervision and services to meet the needs of all youth determined as SAY.
    Laws

    RCW 74.13.075 Sexually Aggressive Youth - Defined

    Policy
    1. When identifying and determining a youth as SAY they must be 8 years or older and must meet one of the following criteria:
      1. The Regional SAY Committee has approved the youth for SAY funded treatment (currently or in the past); or
      2. The Regional SAY/PAAY committee has determined the youth meets the definition of SAY as defined in RCW 74.13.075 ; or
      3. A valid record exists documenting the youth has been found guilty in a court of law for a sexual offense.
    2. All youth identified as SAY must have a signed Youth Supervision Plan (DSHS-15-352) prior to placement, but no later than 72 hours and the plan must be documented in FamLink within seven calendar days.
    3. Youth Supervision and Safety Plans must initially be reviewed and approved by Regional SAY Committee.
    4. All youth identified as SAY must be provided needed services.
    5. Youth identified as SAY must only be placed with licensed caregivers who have completed the CA SAY training.
    6. Youth already placed and then identified as SAY, the caregivers must complete the CA SAY training as soon as possible, but no later than 30 calendar days.
    7. Youth identified as SAY and placed with unlicensed caregivers, the caregiver must complete the CA SAY training as soon as possible, but no later than 30 calendar days.
    8. Regions must establish a SAY Committee. The SAY committees determine youth's SAY identification, eligibility for SAY funded resources as outlined in RCW 74.13.075 and provide quality assurance oversight.
    Procedures
    1. When identifying or removing a youth as SAY complete SAY Determination Referral DSHS-15-399 and submit to regional SAY committee.
    2. Document in FamLink by checking or un-checking the SAY Warning Indicator on the Person Management Page within seven calendar days for youth identified as SAY.
    3. Refer youth needing SAY treatment interventions to the Regional SAY committee, for authorization of SAY funding.

      Referrals must include:

      1. A detailed description of the youth's sexually aggressive act.
      2. Any other relevant information necessary to determine SAY funding needs.
    4. Refer youth approved for SAY service funds to a CA contracted SAY provider for services. Note: Prosecutors may refer youth for SAY services and youth do not need to be CA dependent.
    5. Coordinate services and Youth Supervision and Safety Plan with the SAY contracted provider, youth's caregiver and, if applicable, Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration or county probation.
    6. Complete in FamLink a Youth Supervision Plan DSHS-15-352 on all youth identified as SAY with the youth's caregiver and DLR Licensor (if available) within seven calendar days. Identify with the caregiver as part of the supervision and plan any training, support or consultation they need.
    7. Submit FamLink Youth Supervision Plan DSHS-15-352 to youth's caregiver for review and signature. Provide a copy of the signed plan to the caregiver and place a copy in the case file and upload document in FamLink. Notify the DLR Licensor via email the signed plan has been completed.
    8. Review Youth Supervision Plans at least every six months with caregiver, supervisor and update as needed.
    9. Verify the prospective licensed caregiver has completed the CA SAY training. If the licensed caregiver has not completed the training:
      1. Do not place youth identified as SAY with the caregiver, until training is completed and verified.
      2. Provide the caregiver with information on where and how to access the training.
      3. Discuss and document in the electronic case file the date the caregiver agrees to complete the training.
    10. Verify the unlicensed caregiver has completed the CA SAY training. If the unlicensed caregiver has not completed the training:
      1. Provide them with information on where and how to access the training.
      2. Discuss and document in the electronic case file the date the caregiver agrees to complete the training. This date must be as soon a possible, but no later than 30 days after placement.
    11. Verify the licensed or unlicensed caregiver has completed the CA SAY training when a youth is identified as SAY following placement. If the caregivers have not completed the training:
      1. Provide them with information on where and how to access the training.
      2. Discuss and document in the electronic case file the date the caregiver agrees to complete the training. This date must be as soon a possible, but no later than 30 days of the identification.
    12. Include the following information every six months when requesting reauthorization of funding from the Regional SAY Committee:
      1. SAY provider quarterly reports.
      2. New documented incidents of sexual aggression.
      3. Supervision Plan.
      4. Other new evaluations or reports that are important to determine SAY funding needs.
    13. Note: Polygraph test can only be provided or funded for sexually aggressive youth if a court order requires the test. Plethysmograph will not be approved or funded for sexually aggressive youth.

    Forms and Tools
    • Youth Supervision Plan DSHS-15-352
    • SAY Determination Referral DSHS-15-399
    • FamLink Document upload instructions
    Resources

    45362. Physically Assaultive/Aggressive Youth

    Purpose Statement To guide CA social workers in properly identifying Physically Assaultive/Aggressive Youth (PAAY) and providing the needed supervision and services to meet the needs of all youth identified as PAAY.
    Laws

    RCW 74.13.280 Client Information

    Policy
    1. When identifying and determining a youth as PAAY as defined by RCW 74.13.280 a youth must exhibit one or more of the following behaviors that are developmentally inappropriate and harmful to the child or to others:
      1. Observed assaultive behavior;
      2. Reported and documented history of the child willfully assaulting or inflicting bodily harm; or
      3. Attempting to assault or inflict bodily harm on other children or adults when the child has the apparent ability to carry out the attempted assaults, including threats to use a weapon.
    2. All youth identified as PAAY must have a signed Youth Supervision Plan (DSHS 15-352) prior to placement, but no later than 72 hours and the plan must be documented in FamLink within seven calendar days.
    3. Youth Supervision Plans must initially be reviewed and approved by Regional SAY/PAAY Committee.
    4. All youth identified as PAAY must be provided needed services.
    5. Youth identified as PAAY must only be placed with licensed caregivers who have completed the CA PAAY training.
    6. Youth already placed and then identified as PAAY, the caregivers must complete the CA PAAY training as soon as possible, but no later than 30 calendar days
    7. Youth identified as PAAY and placed with unlicensed caregivers, the caregiver must complete the CA PAAY training as soon as possible, but no later than 30 calendar days.
    8. Regions must establish PAAY committee to determine PAAY identification and provide quality assurance oversight.
    Procedures
    1. When identifying or removing youth as PAAY complete PAAY Determination Referral DSHS-15-400 and submit to regional PAAY committee.
    2. Document in FamLink by checking or un-checking the PAAY Warning Indicator on the Person Management Page within seven calendar days for youth identified as PAAY.
    3. Coordinate service and Youth Supervision Plans for PAAY youth with the contracted provider of services and caregiver.
    4. Complete in FamLink a Youth Supervision Plan DSHS-15-352 on all youth identified as PAAY with the caregiver and DLR Licensor (if available) within seven calendar days. Identify with the caregiver as part of the supervision and plan any training, support or consultation they need.
    5. Submit all Youth Supervision and plans for review and signature by the youth's caregiver. Provide a copy of the signed plan to the caregiver and place a copy in the case file and upload document into FamLink. Notify the DLR Licensor via email the signed plan has been completed.
    6. Review Youth Supervision Plans at least every six months with caregiver, supervisor and update as needed.
    7. Verify a perspective licensed caregiver has completed the CA PAAY training. If the licensed caregiver has not completed the training:
      1. Do not place youth identified as SAY with the caregiver, until training is completed and verified.
      2. Provide the caregiver with information on where and how to access the training.
      3. Discuss and document in the electronic case file the date the caregiver agrees to complete the training.
    8. Verify an unlicensed caregiver has completed the CA PAAY training. If the unlicensed caregiver has not completed the training:
      1. Provide them with information on where and how to access the training.
      2. Discuss and document in the electronic case file the date caregiver agrees to complete the training. This date must be as soon a possible, but no later than 30 days after placement.
    9. Verify a licensed or unlicensed caregiver has completed the CA PAAY training when a youth is identified as PAAY following placement. If the caregivers have not completed the training:
      1. Provide them with information on where and how to access the training.
      2. Discuss and document in the electronic case file the date caregiver agrees to complete the training. This date must be as soon a possible, but no later than 30 days of the identification.
    Forms and Tools
    • Youth Supervision Plan DSHS 15-352
    • PAAY Determination Referral DSHS 15-400
    • FamLink Document upload instructions
    Resources

    4537. Clothing Allowance For Children In Out-Of-Home Care

    45371. Service Definition

    A clothing allowance to supplement a child's clothing supply upon initial placement into out-of-home care or to meet special needs, not met with the standard clothing allowance, while the child remains in out-of-home care.

    45372. Eligibility

    1. The Regional Administrator may issue procedures to enable the social worker, after establishing need, to authorize initial, and annually thereafter as long as the child is in out-of-home care, clothing allowances to provide a supplement to a child's clothing supply. The initial and subsequent clothing allowance each may not exceed $200. This section constitutes a waiver of the $100 limitation in WAC 388-70-042(3). However, the $100 limit pertains if the Regional Administrator has not issued written procedures to enable workers to authorize an amount up to $200. The supplemental clothing allowance is not an entitlement and must be provided within available regional allocations for that purpose.
    2. The Regional Administrator/designee may authorize additional child-specific amounts in accordance with regional procedures following demonstration of need by the assigned social worker.

    45373. Procedures for Access

    1. The Regional Administrator shall issue procedures to enable social workers to obtain additional clothing allowances in accordance with this section. The regional standard must include a regional limit for initial clothing vouchers that does not exceed $200.
    2. The social worker must receive written approval in accordance with regional procedures before authorizing an additional clothing allowance.
    3. The regional procedures must, at minimum, include the following provisions:
      1. The social worker completes a social service authorization, DSHS 14-154A(X), for each anticipated vendor, leaving the exact cost of services blank. If a foster parent or group/ rehabilitative service provider chooses to purchase the clothing and be reimbursed by the department, the care provider may be the vendor.
      2. At the bottom of the authorization, the social worker writes:
        1. The maximum amount authorized; e.g., "NOT TO EXCEED $200."
        2. The name of the purchaser. If the purchaser is the social worker, the worker's supervisor must initial the authorization form.
        3. The clothing items to be purchased. If the exact items are not known, the worker shall use a general description, such as "Miscellaneous clothing for a two-year-old girl."
      3. The social worker routes the client and vendor copy of the authorization to the care provider.
    4. The purchaser and vendor shall follow the steps for payment to the clothing vendor:
      1. The purchaser goes to the vendor, selects clothing, and, in exchange for the clothing, gives the vendor the Vendor copy of the social service authorization.
      2. The vendor gives the purchaser an itemized receipt for the purchase. The vendor may attach their copy of the receipt to their copy of the DSHS 14-154A(X) so they can be matched with the remittance advice accompanying the warrant.
      3. The purchaser signs the receipt and routes it to the local DCFS office.
    5. For reimbursement to a foster parent who has made the purchase, the following steps shall be followed:
      1. The foster parent purchases clothing with their own funds within limits on the DSHS 14-154A(X).
      2. The foster parent requests a separate receipt from the vendor for the clothing, signs it, and routes it to the local DCFS office.
    6. After the purchase, the following steps shall be taken:
      1. The social worker compares the DSHS 14-154A(X) to the receipt and resolves any discrepancies with the purchaser.
      2. The worker enters the exact amount of the purchase on the DSHS 14-154A(X) and terminate the service. The termination code must verify that the service was provided.
      3. The local office transmits the DSHS 14-154A(X) to Olympia in accordance with local procedures.
      4. SSPS then issues a warrant to the vendor in the amount authorized.
    7. The vendor receives the warrant, accompanied by form A-2, Vendor Remittance Advice, showing the clients and warrant amount. The vendor may match the amount and names on the A-2 with the vendor copy of the DSHS 14-154A(X) and resolve discrepancies with the social worker.

    45374. Other Sources

    Resource may be available for special clothing needs through local clothing banks and service organizations.

    4538. Transportation

    45381. Service Definition

    Transportation activity related to making a placement, necessary during and to support the placement, preventing a placement, or returning a child/runaway that is a dependent in this state.

    45382. Eligibility

    1. A child/client of DCFS may be eligible for this service if a transportation need falls within the service definition.
    2. CA may reimburse the expenses upon social worker authorization when the service is consistent with the ISSP, supports a permanent plan, or directly prevents a foster/group care placement, and is not payable from another source.
    3. The Regional Administrator must establish a dollar limit for the total cost of the transportation episode for a child/client, with documented supervisory approval required for amounts above that level.
    4. Within the service definition, the social worker may authorize related travel for the child, parents, relatives, permanent planning resources, and care providers.

    45383. Procedures for Access

    1. The Regional Administrator must issue procedures to enable social workers to authorize transportation services in accordance with this section.
    2. The social worker must receive written approval in accordance with regional procedures before authorizing transportation services exceeding regional limits.
    3. The regional procedures must, at minimum, include the following provisions:
      1. The social worker completes a Social Service Authorization, DSHS 14-154A(X), for each anticipated vendor, leaving the exact cost of services blank unless it is known. If a foster parent or group/rehabilitative service provider chooses to purchase the transportation service and be reimbursed by the department, the care provider may be the vendor.
      2. At the bottom of the authorization, the social worker writes:
        1. The maximum amount authorized; e.g., "NOT TO EXCEED $200." If the travel has already occurred, the social worker opens and closes the DSHS 14-154A/159 in the same action, showing actual amount of payment.
        2. The name of the purchaser. If the purchaser is the social worker, the worker's supervisor must initial the authorization form.
        3. The transportation service to be purchased and from whom; for example, "a bus ticket in the amount of $45.00 dollars to travel from Yakima to Seattle and return using Regional Bus Co."
      3. The social worker routes the client and vendor copy of the authorization to the care provider or user of the transportation.
    4. The purchaser and vendor must follow these steps for payment to the vendor:
      1. The purchaser gives the vendor the Vendor copy of the social service authorization.
      2. The vendor gives the purchaser an itemized receipt for the purchase. The vendor may attach their copy of the receipt to their copy of the DSHS 14-154A(X) so they can be matched with to the remittance advice accompanying the warrant.
      3. The purchaser signs the receipt and routes it to the local DCFS office.
    5. For reimbursement to a foster parent who has provided the transportation, the foster parent submits a signed A-20, Travel Expense Voucher, to the local DCFS office.
    6. After the purchase, the following steps shall be taken:
      1. The social worker compares the DSHS 14-154A(X) to the receipt and resolves any discrepancies with the purchaser.
      2. The worker enters the exact amount of the purchase on the DSHS 14-154A(X) and terminate the service. The termination code must verify that the service was provided.
      3. The local office transmits the DSHS 14-154(X) to Olympia in accordance with local procedures.
      4. SSPS then issues a warrant to the vendor in the amount authorized.
    7. The vendor receives the warrant, accompanied by form A-2, Vendor Remittance Advice, showing the clients and warrant amount. The vendor may match the amount and names on the A-2 with the vendor copy of the DSHS 14-154A(X) and resolve discrepancies with the social worker.
    8. For Medicaid travel reimbursements to private individuals, the social worker must obtain prior approval from the Medical Assistance Administration's Central Authorization Unit at 1-800-228-6641. If approval is given, the social worker obtains billing instructions from the Central Authorization Unit.

    45384. Other Resources

    1. The social worker attempts to obtain the following resources before committing DCFS to pay transportation costs or authorize payments:
      1. Parents/guardian/family.
      2. Volunteers (individual or organization).
      3. Other states for children who may be the responsibility of the other state.
      4. Schools, especially for education-related transportation needs.
      5. Reimbursement by Medicaid for transportation provided by foster parents, guardian, other family members, or volunteers to/from medical services. If the transportation is for a service covered by a medical coupon, the service should be Medicaid-eligible.
      6. Medicaid using a medical coupon for services from ambulances, cabulances, and taxi providers for medical transportation, requiring prior approval by the Area Medical Unit except in emergency situations.
      7. Foster care transportation funds.

    4539. Inpatient Mental Health Treatment For Children

    45391. Service Definition

    1. Services to provide psychiatric/psychological treatment to children in the care and custody of DCFS in a hospital or clinical setting. See section 4521, Psychological/Psychiatric Services, above, for additional guidance. Chapters 13.34 and 71.34 RCW
    2. There are two types of inpatient mental health treatment for children in Washington state:
      1. Acute inpatient care provided in community hospitals and Evaluation and Treatment Centers, and
      2. Long term inpatient care, provided in the five Children's Long Term Inpatient Programs.

    45392. Eligibility

    1. Children who are in the care and custody of DCFS and who require inpatient mental health treatment are eligible for this service.
    2. No social worker shall provide written consent for voluntary inpatient treatment of a minor child except as described in this section; nor shall the social worker seek inpatient treatment of a child in a court-ordered placement (i.e., dependency, Child in Need of Services [CHINS]) without prior written consent of the child's parents whenever possible.
    3. If a parent's prior consent is not possible, then prior approval of the juvenile court is required unless an emergent situation does not allow time for a hearing. In such a case, the social worker will seek court approval within 48 working hours of the placement by requesting a juvenile court hearing.
    4. Consent is not required if the child is involuntarily detained in an Evaluation and Treatment facility by a County Designated Mental Health Professional or is subsequently court ordered through the Involuntary Treatment Act (ITA), chapter 71.34 RCW.
    5. Children 13 years of age and older may voluntarily seek and consent to inpatient treatment without consent of their parent/guardian or the department. Such a child must consent to inpatient treatment except under the conditions set forth in paragraph D, above. Parental consent by itself is insufficient.
    6. Admission to publicly-funded acute inpatient treatment shall occur only if the child meets medical necessity guidelines as determined by the Regional Support Network (RSN)-authorized mental health professional(s) and with the concurrence of the professional person in charge of the facility.
    7. For long-term inpatient psychiatric care, the Children's Long-term Inpatient Program (CLIP) Committee must provide authorization prior to admission. Referral to the CLIP Committee shall only be made by the RSN/Prepaid Health Plan (PHP) of residence. Different access points and procedures may be applied by the local RSN/PHP.

    45393. Procedures for Access

    1. Emergent Or Non-Emergent (Elective) Voluntary Inpatient Mental Health Treatment for a Child in Custody of the Department
      1. For purposes of this policy, “voluntary patient” means:
        1. A minor 13 years of age or older who has been evaluated and determined to meet criteria of medical necessity for inpatient treatment and who gives written consent for inpatient care; or
        2. Any child under the age of 13 whose parent or legal guardian makes application for the child to be evaluated by the appropriate professional and who has been determined to meet criteria of medical necessity for inpatient treatment. The consent of the child is not required in this instance.
        3. Any legally free child who is in the permanent custody of the department and who also meets the conditions outlined in sub-paragraph b, above. The assigned DCFS social worker, with the approval of the supervisor, may sign the consent for treatment of the child under the age of 13.
      2. The following conditions apply if the child is in the department's custody through a dependency order, a voluntary placement agreement (VPA), or a Child in Need of Services (CHINS) order.
        1. If the social worker believes that a minor child is in need of psychiatric inpatient treatment, the social worker follows the following procedures:
          1. The social worker consults his/her supervisor and obtains the concurrence of the supervisor to seek inpatient treatment. The social worker must also consult with the child's parent/legal guardian whenever possible prior to seeking inpatient care.
          2. The social worker, with concurrence of the supervisor, makes an immediate referral to the RSN/PHP certification authority in accordance with state Mental Health Division (MHD) policy Memorandum #96-26 or subsequent revisions.
          3. Children shall only be admitted after a determination of medical necessity.
            • For acute psychiatric care, the RSN/PHP-authorized mental health professional(s) must determine whether medical necessity is met.
            • In either case, the professional person in charge of the facility concurs with the admission.
          4. Once a determination of medical necessity has been made, written consent for admission, treatment, and release of information is given in accordance with the following:
            • For children under 13 years of age, the consent of the parent or legal guardian is required whenever possible, even when the child is under a dependency order.
              • The social worker may give consent for elective care only after obtaining authority to do so from the juvenile court, except when the child is in the permanent custody of the department, in which case the social worker can consent under the permanent custody order. Court review shall occur within 48 hours of the petition except where the department has permanent custody.
              • In emergencies, the social worker may provide written consent for immediate inpatient care within a community hospital.
              • Parental agreement/consent or court review must sanction the social worker's consent within 48 hours, except where the department has permanent custody.
              • Court review does not supplant the authority of the RSN/PHP designated mental health professional(s) and the professional person in charge of the inpatient facility who must determine medical necessity prior to admission.
            • Children 13 years of age and older may consent to treatment without the consent of the parent or social worker. If the parent or social worker does not support inpatient care, they may give notice to the evaluation and treatment facility that admitted the child in accord with chapter 71.34 RCW.
            • The Washington State Supreme Court, in the case of State v. CPC Fairfax Hospital, 129 Wn 2nd 439 (1996), determined that a child 13 years of age or older admitted to that an inpatient facility on application of the child's parent was detained without due process. Since that decision, providers have declined admissions where the consent of the child has not been obtained prior to a voluntary inpatient admission.
              • Thus, for children 13 years of age and older who are unwilling to be admitted to inpatient care, the parental consent is not considered by care providers as sufficient consent for admission against the child's will.
              • In the absence of parental consent, or consent of the child age 13 or above, the social worker may petition the juvenile court for the authority to give consent for the admission against the child's will.
              • In emergencies the social worker may give consent immediately. This type of admission is considered a voluntary (parent-authorized) admission under chapter 71.34 RCW. Court review shall occur within 48 hours of the petition for elective care, and within 48 hours of admission for emergent care. Court review does not supplant the authority of the RSN/PHP designated mental health professional(s) and the professional person in charge of the inpatient facility who must determine medical necessity prior to admission.
            • If the custodial parent does not agree with admission to inpatient care for children of any age, the social worker may file a dependency petition with the court, if one does not already exist. At that time, the social worker may simultaneously request authority to provide consent for inpatient treatment.
    2. Involuntary Inpatient Mental Health Treatment for a Child in Custody of the Department
      1. The following conditions apply if the child is in the department's custody through a dependency order, a VPA, or a CHINS order.
      2. Admission for involuntary treatment may only occur after a determination of medical necessity is made by a County Designated Mental Health Professional (CDMHP). The CDMHP has authority to initially detain for 72 hours in an acute psychiatric facility any child, 13 years of age or older, who meets the criteria for involuntary detention.
        1. CDMHPs are bound by law to explore and utilize less restrictive treatment options when they are available and appropriate. Consent of the parent or minor child is not required for involuntary admission to inpatient care.
        2. Necessity for treatment beyond 72 hours is evaluated by the facility, in concert with significant others involved with that child, and must be ordered by the superior court in accord with chapter 71.34 RCW.
        3. Youth exhibiting the following conditions, as a result of a mental disorder, may be referred to the local CDMHP for assessment if she/he is unwilling to be hospitalized voluntarily:
          1. Is in danger of serious physical harm or manifests severe deterioration in routine functioning resulting from a failure to receive care essential to personal health or safety; and/or
          2. Is a danger to self or others as evidenced by threats or attempts to commit suicide or inflict bodily harm to self or others; and/or
          3. Is likely to cause substantial loss or damage to the property of others.
          Children under the age of 13 may not be involuntarily detained through this process.
    3. Subsequent Admissions-Any subsequent admissions for voluntary care shall require a new assessment and determination and must follow the appropriate protocol as outlined above.

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