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Revised May 8, 2012


Necessary Supplemental Accommodation Services


Purpose: To provide staff with basic information to Social Service Specialists about Community Service Office responsibilities in the identification of individuals needing extra help (an accommodation) to access or maintain services resulting from a disability or learning or literacy issue.

WAC 388-472-0010What are necessary supplemental accommodation services (NSA)?
WAC 388-472-0020How does the department decide if I am eligible for NSA services?
WAC 388-472-0030How can I get NSA services?
WAC 388-472-0040What are the department's responsibilities in giving NSA services to me?

WAC 388-472-0010

WAC 388-472-0010

Effective June 1, 2001

WAC 388-472-0010 What are necessary supplemental accommodation services (NSA)?

Necessary supplemental accommodation (NSA) services are services provided to you if you have a mental, neurological, physical or sensory impairment or other problems that prevent you from getting program benefits in the same way that an unimpaired person would get them.

NSA services include but are not limited to:

  1. Arranging for or providing help to complete and submit forms to us; 

  2. Helping you give or get the information we need to decide or continue eligibility;

  3. Helping you request continuing benefits;

  4. If you miss an appointment or deadline, contacting you about the reason before we reduce or end your benefits;

  5. Explaining to you the reduction in or ending of your benefits (see WAC 388-418-0020);

  6. If we know you have a person who helps you with your applications, notifying them when we need information or when we are about to reduce or end your benefits;

  7. Assisting you with requests for fair hearings;

  8. Providing protective payments if needed, according to WAC 388-265-1250; and

  9. On request, reviewing our decision to terminate, suspend or reduce your benefits.

This is a reprint of the official rule as published by the Office of the Code Reviser. If there are previous versions of this rule, they can be found using the Legislative Search page.

The department is required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to provide full access to services. These accommodations must be provided on an on-going basis to ensure that the client is able to maintain eligibility and fully access program services.


WAC 388-472-0020

WAC 388-472-0020

Effective June 1, 2001

WAC 388-472-0020 How does the department decide if I am eligible for NSA services?

When you, as head of household, apply for benefits either in person or by phone, we screen you to decide if you meet NSA requirements. We explain NSA services to you during the screening. 

  1. We identify you as NSA if you:

    1. Say you need NSA services in order to have equal access to our programs and services;

    2. Have or claim to have a mental impairment;

    3. Have a developmental disability;

    4. Are disabled by alcohol or drug addiction;

    5. Are unable to read or write in any language; or

    6. Are a minor not residing with your parents.

  2. We identify you as NSA if we observe you to have cognitive limitations, whether or not you have a disability, which may prevent you from understanding the nature of NSA services or affect your ability to access our programs. Cognitive limitations are limitations in your ability to communicate, understand, remember, process information, exercise judgement and make decisions, perform routine tasks or relate appropriately with others.

This is a reprint of the official rule as published by the Office of the Code Reviser. If there are previous versions of this rule, they can be found using the Legislative Search page.

WAC 388-472-0030

WAC 388-472-0030

Effective June 1, 2001

WAC 388-472-0030 How can I get NSA services?

  1. After we screen you for NSA eligibility and initially identify your case as NSA, we mark your case file with a uniform NSA identifier. 

  2. After you are initially identified as NSA, we complete an assessment to confirm your NSA designation.

  3. If the assessment confirms your NSA designation, we develop an accommodation plan that specifies the services we will provide to you to improve your access to our programs and services.

  4. If you are designated as NSA according to WAC 388-472-0020(1)&(2), we include all the NSA services listed in WAC 388-472-0010 in your accommodation plan.

  5. Based on your request or a change in your needs, the NSA designation and the accommodation plan may be assessed and changed.

  6. Even if you are eligible to receive NSA services you may refuse NSA services.

This is a reprint of the official rule as published by the Office of the Code Reviser. If there are previous versions of this rule, they can be found using the Legislative Search page.

WAC 388-472-0040

WAC 388-472-0040

Effective October 1, 2013

WAC 388-472-0040 What are the department's responsibilities in giving NSA services to me?

  1. All of our staff are continually responsible to identify you as possibly NSA eligible and assist you with NSA services. 

  2. We provide a grace period to continue your financial or food assistance when:

    1. We stop a benefit because we are unable to tell if you continue to qualify; and

    2. You provide proof you still qualify for the benefit within the twenty days right after the benefit stops. We restore lost benefits recalculate your cash and food assistance, and issue you the correct amount without taking away any benefits as long as you were eligible to receive them.

This is a reprint of the official rule as published by the Office of the Code Reviser. If there are previous versions of this rule, they can be found using the Legislative Search page.

WORKER RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. When department staff work with clients identified as needing NSA, it is critical that the plan be readily available and used to ensure the client is able to fully access services and maintain eligibility.

NOTE:

Most accommodations are easily provided when the need for accommodation is understood. Other service providers, such as DVR may be able to assist in providing accommodations when the client is eligible for DVR services. In some cases, DVR may have adaptive devices that can be shared, such as access to a TTY for communication with persons with hearing impairments.


2.   Continually be alert to cues that might indicate a client is in need of EA services.

3.   Conduct an EA and develop an EA Plan if one has not been done.

 4.    Provide accommodations whenever appropriate.


EXAMPLE

If you know that a particular client needs assistance, it is your ethical and legal responsibility to inform reception staff that the client is identified as EA and what accommodations are necessary, as stipulated in the EA Plan.


Screening

  • Upon application, all DSHS applicants and recipients are assessed for their need for accommodations.
  • Clients are screened using the ACES On-Line EA Screens to determine the need for accommodations and the plan for delivery of services.
  • Most EA screenings and plan development will be done by reception, financial or WorkFirst Program Specialists. 
  • Social Service Specialists will be called upon for their expertise in screening and plan development when necessary.

EA Accommodation Plan

 

Some EA Plans such as interpreter services or assistance with applications can be easily met. However, if the Financial Services Specialists or other staff need assistance in developing the EA Plan, it is important that the CSO Social Service Specialist is consulted. The CSO Social Service Specialist has primary responsibility for developing EA Plans when other staff are unable to accomplish this task due to the special needs of the client.


ACES PROCEDURES

Equal Access and Accommodation Resources:

Search IESA Clarification Database

Modification Date: May 8, 2012