Authorizations

Created on: 
Feb 03 2016

Table of Contents

Related WACs

Child Care Subsidy

Seasonal Child Care

DEL Clarifying Information (published February 1, 2017)

WAC 170-290-0190

Flexible Schedules

Establish a typical or average number of weekly hours for the consumer’s work or approved activities, and multiply by 4.3 to get the monthly total hours.

School-Age Child Care When the Consumer’s Approved Activities are Less Than 110 Hours Per Month
  • When five days of school-age child care is needed weekly during the school year, authorize 30 half-day units (HDUs) per month.
  • When fewer than five days of school-age child care is needed weekly during the school year, authorize the HDUs needed. Add five additional half-day units to cover early release and school closure days.

Additional Information

How to determine a child’s benefit level

Care is authorized using the best available estimate of what the child needs at the time of the application or reapplication. Care is calculated by reviewing the parent(s) approved activity and the child’s school schedule. The Department uses the number of hours of care the child needs in a week and multiplies by 4.3 to determine their monthly authorization.

Note: When a parent is in an approved activity more than five days per week, the Department will do two calculations; the first for a five-day work week, and the second for the additional one to two days per week.

Full time child care benefits

When a parent participates in at least 110 hours of approved activities per month, their child will be authorized full-time care:

When using a licensed provider, full-time care is 23 full-days when the child requires five or more hours per day, or 30 half-days when the child requires fewer than five hours per day. A full-day covers five to ten hours. A half-day covers anything less than five hours.

Most school-age children in licensed care are authorized 30 half-days during the school year and 46 during July and August.  A child who attends care Monday – Friday will use between 19-23 days each month.  30 half-days are authorized so that the child can attend longer on early release days and school breaks.  On days when care provided is 5 or more hours, providers are able to bill 2 half-day units.  During the school year, 30 half-days are typically enough to cover these times.  During July and August 30 half-day authorizations are automatically increased to 46 half-days so that children can attend care 5-10 hours a day during the summer.

When using a Family, Friends and Neighbors (FFN) provider, full-time care is either 115 or 230 hours per month, depending on the amount of care a child needs.  A child who needs an average of fewer than five hours per day will be authorized 115 hours.  A child who needs an average of 5 or more hours per day will be authorized 230 hours.

Most school age children are authorized 115 monthly hours, and providers claim contingency hours when needed to cover more hours of care provided on early release days and school breaks.  A child who is in care Monday – Friday will typically need fewer than 115 hours a month during the school year.   Contingency hours are available on the monthly invoice for school age children and are to be used when extra time is needed due to early release days and school breaks.  The number of available contingency hours varies by month.  During June, July and August 115 contingency hours are available so that a child can be in care up to 10 hours a day, 5 days a week during the summer when school is not in session.   (See Contingency Chart below)

Part-time child care benefits

When a parent participates in fewer than 110 hours of approved activities per month, their children will be authorized for the amount of care needed to cover the parent’s approved activity.

When a parent works varying weekly hours, the Department uses the highest number of weekly hours when calculating the monthly hours.  The Department will attempt to authorize enough care so that children have the coverage they need each month and providers are assured that the care authorized will cover the amount of care provided.

When using a licensed provider, a full-day will be authorized for each day the child requires 5 or more hours and a half-day for each day the child needs care fewer than 5 hours.

For school age children, the authorization will be increased during the summer months so that enough care is authorized to cover the time the parent is participating in their approved activity.  

When using a Family, Friends and Neighbors (FFN) provider, the amount of care authorized will be determined by the parent’s approved activity and the child’s monthly need.  Care is not authorized for the time a child is in school or being home-schooled.    

Contingency hours are available on the monthly invoice for school age children and are to be used when extra time is needed due to early release days and school breaks.  The number of available contingency hours varies by month.  During June, July and August, 115 contingency hours are available so that enough care is authorized to cover the time the parent is participating in their approved activity.  (See Contingency Chart below)

Family, Friend or Neighbor contingency hours

The Department authorizes contingency hours FFN providers caring for school-age children, to cover additional hours of child care needed due to early release days and school vacations that occur throughout the year. The available contingency hours vary by month.

Month

Contingency Hours Allowed

January

70

February

35

March

70

April

70

May

35

June

115

July

115

August

115

September

35

October

35

November

35

December

70

Special Circumstances

  • When care is more than 10 hours per day, overtime care may be authorized as needed without supervisory approval if total care authorized is less than 15 hours.

  • When care is needed 15-16 hours per day, the additional overtime care can be authorized with a supervisor’s approval.

  • Children who are authorized 30 half-days during the school year may need additional care which can be authorized with supervisor’s approval.

  • Children who require more than 46 half-days during the summer months may have additional care authorized with supervisor’s approval.

  • In a 2-parent household, the time that neither parent is able or available to care for children is used to determine whether the family meets the 110 hour rule requirement.

  • When a family has more than one provider, the Department first determines whether the family meets the 110-hour rule requirement, and then authorizes care based on how the family intends to use each provider.

  • When a child lives with parents in two households, if both parents are eligible for CCSP, the 110-hour rule is applied separately for each parent and their approved activity. When one or both parents don’t meet the 110-hour requirement, care is authorized based on the child’s need in that parent’s case only.

  • When care takes place overnight, the Department will authorize care based on what is needed for each calendar day starting at 12:01 a.m. and ending at Midnight the same day.

Benefit level scenarios

Example 1

The parent’s approved activity including travel time at application snapshot is Monday-Friday 8:30am-1:30pm. There are 2 children, one is 3 years old, the other 6, and in school 12:00pm-3:00pm.  

Licensed Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 5 x 5 = 25 x 4.3 = 107.5 hours per month. 
 
The family doesn’t meet the 110 hour rule requirement to be eligible for full-time care. 
 
Non-school age: The child needs full-days because care is 5 hours each day the child is in care 5FDU/week*4.3= 21.5 units, rounded up to 22.  Because the family doesn’t meet the 110 hour rule we authorize the amount of care needed which is 23 full-day units to allow enough units for the longer months of the year.

School age child:   The child needs care from 8:30 until 12:00 M-F.  The child needs half-days because care is less than 5 hours per day.    Authorize 30 half-day units using new service code so that child can be auto increased to 46 half-day units for summer.
 

Family/Friend/Neighbor Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 5 x 5 = 25 x 4.3 = 107.5 hours per month. 
 
The family doesn’t meet the 110 hour rule requirement to be eligible for full-time care. 
 
Non-school age: The child needs care 5 hours per day, 5 days per week.  5 x 5 = 25 x 4.3 = 107.5 hours per month.  Authorize 108 hourly units.

School age child:   The child needs care from 8:30 until 12:00 M-F.  3.5 hours per day x 5 days per week = 17.5 x 4.3 = 75.25.  Authorize 76 hourly units.  No need to increase authorization for the summer as provider can bill up to 115 contingency hours for care provided.

     

Example 2

The parent’s approved activity including travel time at snapshot is Monday-Friday 8am-5pm.  There are 2 children, one is 2 years old, the other 8, and in school 9:00am-3:00pm.  

Licensed Care
Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5 hours per month.
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care. 
 
Non- school age: The child needs care 9 hours per day, 5 days per week.  Authorize 23 full-day units
 
School age: The child needs care for 3 hours per day.  Authorize 30 half-day units using new service code so that child can be auto increased to 46 half-day units for summer.
 
Family/Friend/Neighbor Care
Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5 hours per month.
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care. 
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, 5 days per week.  Authorize 230 hourly units.
 
School age:  The school age child needs care for 3 hours per day.   Authorize 115 hourly units.  No need to increase authorization for the summer as provider can bill up to 115 contingency hours for care provided.
 

 

Example 3

At application snapshot parent works a varied weekly schedule, and works 3-5 days a week from 9am-4pm.  She rides the bus to and from work which takes 1 hour each way.  There are 2 children, one is 4 years old, the other 11, and in school 8:00am – 3:00pm.   

Licensed Care

Because the parent works varying weekly hours, use the highest number of weekly hours to calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care.
 
Non- school age: The child needs care 9 hours per day, 5 days per week.  Authorize 23 full-day units.

School age: The child needs care for 2-3 hours per day.  Authorize 30 half-day units using new service code so that child can be auto increased to 46 half-day units for summer.

Family/Friend/Neighbor Care

Because the parent works varying weekly hours, use the highest number of weekly hours to calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full- time care.
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, 5 days per week.  Authorize 230 hourly units.
 
School age: On average, the school age child needs care for 2-3 hours per day.   Authorize 115 hourly units.  No need to increase authorization for the summer as provider can bill up to 115 contingency hours for care provided.

 

Example 4

At application snapshot the parent works Monday - Wednesday 7am-3pm including travel time. There are two 2 children, one is 2 years old, the other 7, and in school Monday - Friday 9am-3pm with early release on Wednesdays at 12pm.  

Licensed Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 8 x 3 = 24 x 4.3 = 103.2
 
The family does not meet the 110 hour rule requirement and is not eligible for full time care.
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 8 hours per day, 3 days per week.  3 x 4.3 = 12.9.  Authorize 13 full-day units.
 
School age:  The child needs care for 2 hours on Mondays and Tuesdays and 5 on Wednesdays.  Authorize 14 half-day units and 5 full-day units. The authorization will need to be manually reviewed and the authorization increased to 13 full-days for July and August.

Family/Friend/Neighbor Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 8 x 3 = 24 x 4.3 = 103.2
 
The family does not meet the 110 hour rule requirement and is not eligible for full time care

Non- school age:  The child needs care 8 hours per day, 3 days per week.  8 x 3 = 24 x 4.3 = 103.2. Authorize 104 hourly units.
 
School age:  The child needs care for 2 hours on Mondays and Tuesdays and 5 on Wednesdays. 9 x 4.3 = 38.7.  Authorize 39 hourly units. No need to increase authorization for the summer as provider can bill up to 115 contingency hours for care provided.

 

Example 5

At application snapshot the parent works a rotating schedule of 4 days on, 2 off and the shift is from 8:00am-5:00pm including travel time.  There are two children, one age 4 years, and the other 10, and in school 9am-3pm. 

Licensed Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.50

The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full time care. Authorize care based on the maximum number of hours so that the provider has enough units to bill each month

Non- school age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, 4-5 days per week.  Authorize 23 full-day units. 
 
School age:
  The child needs care 3-9 hours per day, and needs both half and full-days.  Authorize two service lines.
 
Half-days:  For weekday care:  Authorize 30 half-day units using new service code so that child can be auto increased to 46 half-day units for summer. 
 
Full-days:  For weekend care:  2 x 4.3 = 8.6, round up to 9.  Authorize 9 full-day units with supervisor approval.   
 

Family/Friend/Neighbor Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.50

The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full time care. Authorize care based on the maximum number of hours needed each month so that the provider has enough units to bill each month.  

Non- school age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, 4-5 days per week.  Authorize 230 hourly units.
 
School age:  Use the maximum weekly hours needed to determine if 115 or 230 hours should be authorized.   At most the child will need care 9 hours 2 days a week and 3 hours up to 4 days a week, depending on the weekly rotation. 

9 x 2 = 18 + 3 x 4 = 12 to total 30 hours a week.  30 hours divided by 6 days = 5 hours per day on average. Because the daily average is 5 or more hours, authorize 230 hourly units

 

Example 6

The parent works a varied weekly schedule and averages 25-35 hours per week, usually working 4-5 weekly shifts.  Shifts can be daytime, evenings and weekends.  Travel time is 1 hour each way. There are 2 children, one age 4 years, the other age 7, and in school 9am-3pm.    

Licensed Care

Because the parent works varying weekly hours, use the highest number of weekly hours to calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care.
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 7-9 hours per day, 4-5 days per week.  Authorize 23 full-day units.

School age:  The child needs care for 1-9 hours per day.  Authorize 23 full-day units.

Family/Friend/Neighbor Care

Because the parent works varying weekly hours, use the highest number of weekly hours to calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care. 
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 7-9 hours per day, 4-5 days per week.  Authorize 230 hourly units.
 
School age:  Use the maximum weekly hours needed to determine if 115 or 230 hours should be authorized.  The child needs care anywhere between 1 & 9 hours per day, 4-5 days a week.  Because the child may need 5 or more hours most days, authorize 230 hourly units

 

Example 7

The parent works Sunday – Thursday 7am - 4pm including travel time.  There are two 2 children, one is 4 years old, the other 7, and in school Monday - Friday 9am-3pm.  Parent uses two providers.  Licensed care for the weekdays and Family/Friend/Neighbor Care for Sundays.   The full time authorization is split between two providers, one licensed and one FFN. 

Licensed Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45 x 4.3 = 193.5
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care. 
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, 4 days per week.  4 x 4.3 = 17.2 Authorize 18 full-day units to licensed provider.

School age:  The child needs care for 1 hour per day Mondays through Thursday.  4 x 4.3 = 17.2 + 5 extra half-day units = 23.  Authorize 23 half-day units to licensed provider.
 
Note:  If the family was using only licensed care, either 23 full-days or 30 half-days would be authorized even though the provider may be closed on Sundays.

Family/Friend/Neighbor Care

Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity: 9 x 5 = 45  x 4.3 = 193.5

The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full-time care.
 
Non- school age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, up to 5 days per month. Authorize 50 hourly units.  This authorization does not need supervisory approval because the total care authorized for the non-school age child does not exceed 23 full-days. 
 
School age:  The child needs care 9 hours per day, up to 5 days per month.  Authorize 50 hourly units with supervisor approval. This authorization requires supervisor approval because the total care authorized exceeds 30 half-day units.

Note: The total amount of care authorized between multiple providers must be a minimum of 23 full-days, 30 half-days, or 115/230 hours.  In this scenario the total care authorized is full time.   

 

 

 

How is care calculated for a self-employed client?

The Department takes the client’s gross monthly income and divides it by the federal minimum wage ($7.25/hour) to determine the amount of hours needed for their self-employment activity. Any other care needs—travel time, school, regular employment, study time, etc.—are then added in. If the total is 110 hours or more, the client is eligible for full-time care.

Example 8

After deducting business expenses, a client makes $1,000 per month from self-employment. The client reports their schedule as Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. including travel time of 15 minutes each way. There are two children: one is 3 years old, the other 9 and in school Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 3 pm.

Licensed Care
Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity using the self-employment calculation: $1,000 / $7.25 = 137.9
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full time care.
 
Non-school age: The child needs care 9 hours per day, 5 days per week. 23 full-day units will be authorized.
 
School age: The child needs care 2.5 hours per day, 5 days per week. 30 half-day units will be authorized during the school year and increased to 46 half-days in July and August.
 
Family, Friends and Neighbors Care
Calculate the monthly hours of approved activity using the self-employment calculation: $1,000 / $7.25 = 137.9
 
The family meets the 110 hour rule requirement and is eligible for full time care.
 
Non-school age: The child needs care 9 hours a day, 5 days per week.  230 hourly units will be authorized
 
School age: The child needs care 2.5hours per day, 5 days per week. 115 hourly units will be authorized.  No need to increase authorization for the summer as provider can bill up to 115 contingency hours for care provided.