Office of Juvenile Justice

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All Applicants responding to the current Requests for Proposals should check the Bidders Q&A document for questions and answers that were received after the bidders call.


The Washington State Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice (WA-PCJJ) is requesting proposals from Tribal governments for the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act Title II Formula Grants Program, Native American Pass-Through funding.

WA-PCJJ and the Office of Juvenile Justice administer federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) Title II Formula Grants Program, which includes funding for eligible Federally-recognized American Indian and Native American tribes. Minimum awards for tribes are calculated for each state based on the number of juveniles that are provided services by tribes with law enforcement functions.

The WA-PCJJ has funding available for Native American Tribes to address juvenile justice needs of their youth.  Needs specifically related to the following WA-PCJJ priority areas:

  • Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders: Remove non-offender youth (such as a dependent or neglected child) and status offenders (such as a runaway or truant) from locked facilities.
  • Racial & Ethnic Disparities Reduction: Address juvenile delinquency prevention and system improvement efforts designed to reduce the disproportionate number of Native American youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system, with a focus on the arrest and referral decision points.
  • Reentry and Transitional Programs: Programs that support youth and their families with the process of reentry and transition back into their home communities from either local detention facilities or state institutions.
  • Restorative Justice: A collaborative community based approach to juvenile justice that holds juvenile offenders accountable to the people and communities they have harmed, enhances community safety and security, provides offender rehabilitation and reintegration, and respects the rights of victims in the process.
  • Strengthening the Juvenile Justice System in Rural Areas: The WA-PCJJ recognizes the unique needs and challenges of juvenile justice systems in rural and underserved communities for community collaboration, program planning and capacity building, and to address individual needs of rural communities.

Funds can be utilized for new efforts or for expansion of current efforts in the identified program area.

How to apply:

Please see application instructions in the RFP (Word).

Applications will also require use of the following application form: Federal Grant Application Form (Word)

Applicant must submit all documents listed in SECTION C: INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING CONTENT, FORMAT, AND SUBMISSION OF WRITTEN RESPONSES.

All applications must be received by the Office of Juvenile Justice no later than 5pm on December 22, 2017.  Applications may be hand delivered; electronically (PDF Format Only) submitted or mailed US Postal.  Please note:  If utilizing US Postage, the application packet still must be received by the Office of Juvenile Justice no later than 5pm on December 22, 2017. 


Bidders Call Q&A

 

RELEASE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The Washington State Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice (WA-PCJJ) announces the release of the following two (2) new Requests for Proposals.

1.       Racial and Ethnic Disparities Reduction:  The WA-PCJJ is seeking to fund initiative(s) that would increase enrollment and completion of evidence-based behavioral health programs by youth, especially youth of color, who are in diversion, detention, or JR systems. 

2.       Re-Entry and Transition Programs:  The WA-PCJJ is seeking to fund programs that support youth and their families with the process of re-entry and transition back into their home communities from either local detention facilities or state institutions with a special emphasis on one or more of the following areas:

·         Youth and Family Engagement,

·         Education Engagement and/or Employment, and

·         Behavioral Health Needs.

How to apply: 

Please see application instructions in each RFP: 

·         Racial and Ethnic Disparities Reduction RFP (Word)

·         Re-Entry and Transition Programs RFP (Word)

Applications will also require use of this following application form (Word).

 

All applications must be received by the Office of Juvenile Justice no later than 5pm on December 4, 2017.  Applications may be hand delivered, electronically (PDF Format Only) submitted or mailed US Postal.  Please note:  If utilizing US Postage, the application packet still must be received by the Office of Juvenile Justice no later than 5pm on December 4, 2017.

 

Joint Summit on Gang Prevention and Intervention

 
Agenda (pdf)

Summit


SMART ON JUVENILE JUSTICE: Statewide Juvenile Justice Reform Planning Project

The Rehabilitation Administration - RA has received grant funding from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention to support a Smart on Juvenile Justice: Statewide Juvenile Justice Reform Planning project. The two-year effort will develop a statewide plan to improve public safety and outcomes for youth, focused on reducing the out-of-home placement of juveniles committing status and low-level offenses. The project also will explore ways to reduce racial disparity in juvenile justice referral, detention and incarceration rates. The Council of State Governments Justice Center will provide training and technical assistance.

On June 15, 2017, Rehabilitation Administration Assistant Secretary Marybeth Queral and Center for Children & Youth Justice President Bobbe Bridge spoke on TVW Inside Olympia.

How is our juvenile justice system working, and does it need reform? 

https://www.tvw.org/watch/?eventID=2017061038

The Smart on Juvenile Justice Reform Planning process is a collaboration of more than 40 members of the institutions, organizations, and individuals involved and affected by the affected by the system who serve on a task force chaired by former Supreme Court Justice Bobbe Bridge, founding CEO and President of the Center for Children & Youth Justice.

For more information about the task force, please contact the Office of Juvenile Justice at (360) 902-0801 or email coil.alice@dshs.wa.gov

 

 

What We Do

The Office of Juvenile Justice - OJJ is responsible for monitoring Washington state’s compliance with the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. Additionally, OJJ provides staff support to the Washington State Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice. 

Monitoring of compliance with federal laws:  In order to receive federal block grant funds related to juvenile justice, the state must achieve and maintain compliance with the four core requirements of the Act:

  • Eliminating or preventing the placement of non-offending youth (such as a dependent or neglected child) and status offenders (such as a runaway or truant) in secure facilities. (Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders, or DSO)

  • Eliminate the confinement of juveniles in adult jails and lockups. (Jail Removal)

  • Ensure complete sight and sound separation of juveniles from adult offenders in secure facilities (such as adult jails and lockups), when they are held. (Separation)

  • Address juvenile delinquency prevention and system improvement efforts designed to reduce the disproportionate number of juvenile members of minority groups who come into contact with the juvenile justice system. (Disproportionate Minority Contact, or DMC)

Funding and programs: The Partnership also administers Annie E. Casey Foundation and state funding specifically for the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative; state funding for the Criminal Street Gang Prevention and Intervention Grant Program (established in 2012); and pass-through state dollars for the TeamChild Program.

The Washington State Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice provides information and recommendations to the Governor and other juvenile justice stakeholders. It promotes partnerships and innovations to improve outcomes for juvenile offenders and their victims, to build family and community capacity to prevent delinquency, and to provide analysis and expertise to state and local policymakers.

For additional information regarding the WA-PCJJ membership and priorities, please click here.