Disability Determination - Concurrent Disability / Incapacity Determination Process

Created on: 
Dec 01 2015

Summary

  1. Under the concurrent process, the Department first attempts to obtain medical evidence necessary to determine eligibility for ABD cash assistance identified in WAC 388-449-0015.                                                                                                                                                   
  2. If the applicant does not meet ABD disability criteria outlined in WAC 388-449-0001 or fails to provide the medical evidence necessary for the Department to determine ABD eligibility within the 45 day standard of promptness, the Department will consider eligibility for the HEN Referral program.
  3. Medical evidence necessary to determine HEN Referral eligibility is outlined in WAC 388-447-0005 and WAC 388-447-0010.

Worker Responsibilities

  1. Review available records and approve ABD when the applicant meets any of the non-SEP criteria outlined in WAC 388-449-0001.
  2. If available records are not sufficient to approve ABD, complete a social service intake assessment and review available records to determine what additional evidence is necessary to determine ABD disability.
  3. Request medical records from within the past 5 years associated with any potentially disabling impairment(s).
  4. Request a mental health or physical evaluation from an ABD acceptable medical source identified in WAC 388-449-0010 only when current medical records are insufficient to determine ABD eligibility or when the impairment has not been established by an ABD acceptable medical source within the past 5 years.
  5. If sufficient medical evidence necessary to determine ABD eligibility is not received within the 45 day standard of promptness or the applicant does not meet ABD disability criteria, consider eligibility for the HEN Referral program.
NOTE: See #3 of the When HEN Referral Eligibility Ends section for information regarding when a new SEP is conducted for an active HEN Referral recipient.
NOTE: A social service intake assessment is not required to determine ABD disability. If the applicant fails to complete a social service intake assessment, review available evidence to determine if the applicant meets the approval criteria detailed in WAC 388-449-0001. If the applicant meets the approval criteria detailed in WAC 388-449-0001, approve ABD. If the applicant does not meet the approval criteria detailed in WAC 388-449-0001, deny ABD for no medical evidence.

Disability Determination - Step 1

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

WAC 388-449-0005 Sequential Evaluation Process Step 1 -- How does the department determine if you are performing substantial gainful employment?

The SGA is an earnings standard that is adjusted periodically by SSA. An individual may be financial eligible for ABD cash but fail the disability requirement if they are working and earning above the SGA limit. Examples of jobs that a person may that aren’t counted toward ABD when determining financial eligibility, but are considered when determining SGA are earnings from:

  •  Work study
  •  AmeriCorps
  •  University Year for Action
  •  Urban Crime Prevention Program
  •  Retired Senior Volunteer Program

Disability Determination - Step 2

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

WAC 388-449-0035 How does the department assign severity ratings to my impairment?

WAC 388-449-0040 How does the department determine the severity of mental impairments?

WAC 388-449-0045 How does the department determine the severity of physical impairments?

WAC 388-449-0050 How does the department determine the severity of multiple impairments?

WAC 388-449-0060 Sequential Evaluation Process step II - How does the department review medical evidence to determine if I am eligible for benefits?


  1. The severity of an impairment is the extent to which it affects the individual's ability to perform basic work activities.
  2. The Disability Specialist determines severity based on medical and other evidence received by the Department. When the individual needs help obtaining necessary evidence (e.g. meets Equal Access criteria or requests assistance), the Disability Specialist assists the individual in obtaining necessary evidence.
  3. Severity ratings are assigned to all medically determinable impairments, meaning all impairments that could reasonably result from a condition diagnosed by an acceptable medical source identified in WAC 388-449-0010.
  4. Severity ratings are assigned by the Disability Specialist based on the overall medical evidence and input received from the contracted Review of Medical Evidence (RME).
EXAMPLE - Betty provides a physical evaluation that indicates she has severe hyperlipidemia. Betty has no symptoms that currently impair her ability to perform basic work activities resulting from the condition. The Disability Specialist assigns a severity of "none" to Betty's hyperlipidemia.
EXAMPLE - Tim has been diagnosed with multi-level degenerative disc disease involving his lumbar spine. An L-spine MRI indicates a broad based disc protrusion mildly indents the thecal sac at the L4-5 level. Available medical evidence indicates Tim experiences intermittent numbness and weakness in his left leg and has significantly limited range of motion in his back secondary to pain. The Disability Specialist assigns a "marked" severity to Tim’s degenerative disc disease.
EXAMPLE - Phil has been diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder by a contracted psychologist. The Psychological Evaluation indicates Phil has suffered from frequent anxiety and excessive worry, which he is unable to control, for at least the past 12 months. The psychologist notes Phil has difficulty concentrating, becomes irritable, and has difficulty sleeping. The BAI completed as part of the Psychological Evaluation is consistent with marked-to-severe anxiety. The contracted psychologist notes significant limits on Phil's ADLs and assigned a GAF of 45. Based on the overall clinical findings and objective evidence, the Disability Specialist assigns a "marked" severity.
  1. When an individual has multiple impairments, we consider whether the impairments have a cumulative effect on their ability to perform basic work activities.
  2. The Disability Specialist assigns a higher overall severity if the cumulative effect of multiple impairments results in a greater impact on the individual's ability to perform one or more basic work activity.
EXAMPLE - Jerry has been diagnosed with moderate C-spine degenerative disc disease. He also has moderate arthritis involving his dominant hand. Based on medical and other evidence received, the two conditions result in a very significant limitation in Jerry's ability to handle and manipulate objects. Based on the cumulative effect on Jerry's ability to perform a basic work activity, the Disability Specialist assigns a "marked" overall severity.

Clarifying Information

  1. ABD Disability Determinations are made by a team consisting of a Disability Specialist and a contracted doctor.
  2. The contracted doctor reviews the diagnosis, severity, functional limitations, duration and onset date recorded by the Disability Specialist if the individual has at least a moderate overall severity that has lasted or is expected to last 12 months or more or result in death.
  3. The Disability Specialist makes necessary adjustments to the diagnosis, severity, functional impairments, and onset date based on the contracted doctor's professional medical opinion when supported by objective medical evidence. All adjustments are made prior to determining whether the individual meets the disability criteria in Step 2 of the ABD Sequential Evaluation Process (SEP).
  4. If the severity ratings or functional limitations provided by the evaluating medical provider are adjusted, the Disability Specialist must clearly describe the reason why we rejected the medical evidence provider's opinion and identify the medical evidence used to make the determination.
  5. If the overall impairment is of at least a moderate severity and the impairment has lasted or is expected to last 12 months or more or result in death, the Disability Specialist proceeds with the ABD Sequential Evaluation process.
  6. The Disability Specialist denies ABD at Step II if:
    1. The overall impairment is mild, meaning there is not a significant impact on the ability to perform at least one basic work activity.
    2. The impairment has not lasted or is not expected to last 12 months or more or result in death; or
    3. Medical evidence indicates substance use is material to the impairment as defined in WAC 388-449-0015.
NOTE: In general, the opinion of a treating provider is given more weight than that of the contracted RME doctor who has not examined or treated the individual. In addition, the opinion of a specialist involving an area of his or her expertise is given more weight than that of a non-specialist.

Disability Determination - Step 3

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

Purpose:

Process to determine if a person's impairments meet the SSA listings of impairments criteria.

WAC 388-449-0070 Sequential Evaluation Process step III — How does the department determine if you meet SSA listing of impairments criteria?


Clarifying Information 

  1. Individuals whose impairments meet the SSA listing of impairments criteria are determined to be disabled regardless of their ability to do past work or other work.
  2. The listing of impairments have very specific criteria defined by SSA that must be met in order to determine a person is disabled at this step.
  3. The overall mental or physical impairment severity must be at least marked to consider an for meeting listing criteria.
  4. If the specific diagnostic and other medical criteria for a specific listing is met, the functional impairments that meet the remainder of the listing criteria do not need to be the direct result of the disabling impairments. Other impairments or the treatment of the primary or secondary impairments may contribute to the person's  functional limitations.
    EXAMPLE- Terry has been diagnosed with systemic sclerosis and major depression. The Disability Program Specialist takes all the medical and other evidence into consideration when determining if Terry meets the functional impairment criteria for listing 14.04 (Systemic sclerosis). The Disability Program Specialist does not need determine whether Terry's documented fatigue, weight loss, and social impairments are the result of the systemic sclerosis or the major depression.
  5. A person whose impairments do not meet listing criteria may found to be disabled at Step 4 or Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation process.

​Worker Responsibilities

Select the body system for the most disabling impairment (SSA Blue Book):

1.00 Musculoskeletal System

2.00 Special Senses and Speech

3.00
Respiratory System

4.00 Cardiovascular System

5.00 Digestive System

6.00 Genitourinary Impairments

7.00
Hematological Disorders

8.00
Skin Disorders

9.00 Endocrine Disorders

10.00
Impairments that Affect
Multiple Body Systems

11.00 Neurological

12.00 Mental Disorders

13.00 Malignant Neoplastic Diseases

14.00 Immune System Disorders

  1. Review the overview for the listings in the appropriate body system.
  2. Determine the specific listing subcategory that describes the person’s impairment. Some listings are specific to only one diagnosis, others describe a chronic condition within a body system that may have multiple diagnosis or underlying causes for the listed impairments.
  3. Compare the description of listing subcategory with the medical evidence.
    • Does the person’s impairment, based on available medical evidence, match the description?
    • If the person’s impairment doesn’t match the description, the person cannot be approved at this step. Continue with the evaluation process (STEP 4).
    • For some listing categories, a documented diagnosis is all that is necessary to establish that an impairment meets a listing subcategory
  4. Compare the medical evidence testing and documentation requirements to the medical evidence in the ECR.
    • Does the available medical evidence meet the specific requirements given for listing category and sub category?
    • If the testing or medical documentation doesn’t match the specific criteria, the person cannot be approved at this step. Continue with the evaluation process (STEP 4).
  5. Compare the description of functional impairments with the medical evidence, other evidence and functional assessment. Typically the person must meet one the functional limitation descriptions associated with a listing. For mental illness and some physical disorders, the person’s functional limitations must meet all of the criteria listed or specific set as described for the specific listing subcategory.
    • Does the person’s functional limitations, based on available medical and other evidence, match all of the necessary criteria for the listing subcategory?
    • If the person’s impairment doesn’t meet the functional criteria, the person cannot be approved at this step. Continue with the evaluation process (Step 4).
  6. If the person’s impairments meet all the required diagnostic, testing, documentation, and functional impairment criteria for a specific listing subcategory:
    1. Approve disability for ABD.
    2. Document the testing (if applicable) and functional limitations that allowed for an approval at this step of the process.

Disability Determination - Step 4

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

WAC 388-449-0080Sequential Evaluation Process step IV — How does the department evaluate if I am able to perform relevant past work?


Clarifying Information

An individual who is 55 years of age or older meets ABD disability criteria if their impairment prevents them from performing all relevant past work from within the past 15 years.

​WorkerResponsibilities

Social Service Intake Interview

  1. In order to be considered relevant past work:
  2. The work must have been performed within the past 15 years;
    1. The past work must be considered a “substantial gainful activity" as defined in WAC 388-449-0005; and
    2. The individual must have performed the work long enough to meet the Specific Vocational Preparation(SVP) level identified in the Dictionary of
    3. Occupational Titles (DOT) for the corresponding job listing.
  3. Assign an exertional level (e.g. sedentary, light, medium, heavy) to the each specific relevant past work experience that is consistent with the Strength Rating identified in the DOT for the specific job title. Specific DOT job titles can be located using the DOT Search function.
  4. Document any transferable skills the individual gained during each relevant past work episode based on the individual’s specific job duties. Transferable skills are considered at Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process (SEP).
EXAMPLE Henry worked as a roofer for 2 years ending in 2008. As a regular part of his weekly job duties, Henry visited potential job sites and provided labor and material estimates as part of the bidding process. While Henry’s work as a roofer required the ability to perform medium work, he developed transferable skills as a bidder (Estimator/DOT Code 169.267-038) and therefore has sedentary transferable skills.

Sequential Evaluation Process

  1. If the individual is neither denied ABD at Step 1 or Step 2, nor approved for ABD at Step 3, the Disability Specialist determines whether the individual is capable of performing relevant past work.
  2. For each relevant past work episode, the Disability Specialist compares the skill and physical demands identified for the specific corresponding DOT job title to the individual’s residual functional capacity to determine whether the individual is capable of returning to past work.
  3. When determining residual functional capacity, the Disability Specialist gives full consideration to all limitations supported by available medical and other evidence. Limitations include:
    1. mental (e.g. social and cognitive factors);
    2. exertional (e.g. work level);
    3. non-exertional (e.g.visual/auditory limitations, inability to work at heights,chemical sensitivities); and
    4. functional limitations (e.g. restrictions related to unrelieved pain or the effects of prescribed medication)resulting from a medically determinable impairment that are supported by available medical and other evidence.
  4. ABD is denied if the individual is capable of returning to relevant past work.
  5. If the individual is not capable of returning to relevant past work, the Disability Specialist proceeds to Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process (SEP) and considers whether the individual is capable of performing other work available in the national economy.
NOTE: "Residual Functional Capacity" is an assessment of an individual's ability to do sustained work-related physical and mental activities in a work setting on a regular and continuing basis. A "Regular and continuing basis" means 8 hours a day, for 5 days a week, or an equivalent work schedule. See SSR 96-8p for additional details.

Disability Determination - Step 5

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

WAC 388-449-0100 Sequential Evaluation Process step V — How does the department evaluate if I can perform other work when determining disability?


​Worker Responsibilities

  1. If an individual is not approved at Step 3 and not denied at Steps 1, 2, or 4 of the Sequential Evaluation Process (SEP), the Disability Specialist determines if the individual can perform other work.
  2. When determining if the individual is capable of performing other work, the Disability Specialist gives full consideration to the individual's residual functional capacity, age, education, and work experience.
    NOTE: The Social Security Administration (SSA) defines residual functional capacity (RFC)as the most the individual can do despite their impairment based on an assessment of an individual's ability to do sustained work-related physical and mental activities in a work setting on a regular and continuing basis. A "Regular and continuing basis" means 8 hours a day, for 5 days a week, or an equivalent work schedule. See SSR 96-8p for additional details.
  3. If the individual meets the approval criteria detailed in the Physical, Mental, or Combination tables in WAC 388-449-0100, they are considered unable to perform other work and ABD is approved.
  4.  If the individual does not meet the ABD approval criteria detailed in the Physical, Mental, or Combination tables, the Disability Specialist determines whether the individual is capable of performing at least two jobs available in the national economy.
  5. If the Disability Specialist determines the individual is capable of performing other work available in the national economy, the Disability Specialist must list at least two specific jobs from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) that the individual is able to perform given their residual functional capacity, age, education, and work experience.
  6. If the Disability Specialist cannot identify at least two examples of jobs the individual can perform despite their impairment, ABD is approved.

Disability Determination - Review of Disability

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

WAC 388-449-0150 When does my eligibility for the Aged, Blind, or Disabled (ABD) cash benefits end?


Review and Termination of ABD Cash

  1. The Disability Specialist must review current medical evidence and determine whether the individual meets the ABD disability criteria detailed in WAC 388-449-0001 (3) at least every 24 months.
  2. The Disability Specialist must initiate the disability review far enough in advance to request and consider available medical evidence from the individual's treating medical providers and request clarification and/or additional medical records when necessary to determine ongoing ABD eligibility.
  3. If the individual meets Equal Access (EA) criteria, the Disability Specialist must follow all requirements of the EA plan when reviewing disability.
  4. The Disability Specialist may initiate an early Disability Review at any time, if the Department receives information indicating that the individual is no longer likely to meet SSI disability criteria.
  5. Eligibility for ABD cash ends when a final disability determination is made by SSA or when the individual no longer meets the ABD disability criteria detailed in WAC 388-449-0001 (3).
  6. A final SSA disability determination includes an SSI or SSDI denial at the SSA Post-Appeal stage or an unfavorable determination at the initial, reconsideration, or hearing state for which the individual fails to file a timely appeal.
  7. When SSI or SSDI is denied for any reason, the SSI Facilitator reviews the case record and SSI notice to determine if the individual continues to meet ABD financial criteria detailed in WAC 388-400-0060 and the ABD disability criteria outlined in WAC 388-449-0001 (3).
    1. If it appears the individual no longer meets ABD financial criteria, the SSI Facilitator notifies the Financial Service Specialist that a review of eligibility is needed.
    2. If it appears the individual no longer meets ABD disability criteria, the SSI Facilitator notifies the Disability Specialist that an early Disability Review is needed.
NOTE: An ABD Disability Review is not required for recipients age 65 or older.
NOTE: Screen for EA and implement any necessary accommodations when an individual frequently fails to follow through and/or expresses difficulty understanding program requirements.

Disability Determination - Acceptable Medical Evidence

Revised on: March 23, 2018

WAC 388-449-0010 What evidence do we consider to determine disability?

WAC 388-449-0015 What medical evidence do I need to provide?


Clarifying Information- WAC 388-449-0010

  1. A diagnosis of a medically determinable impairment must be from an “acceptable medical source” as defined in WAC 388-449-0010. The diagnosis must be supported by objective medical evidence described in WAC 388-449-0015 and be based on an examination within 5 years of the application date.
  2. After a diagnosis is established, we can use medical evidence from “treating medical sources” as current medical evidence.
  3. Once we have a diagnosis and current medical evidence, we may include “other evidence” as supporting documentation.

Clarifying Information- WAC 388-449-0015

  1. Statements regarding how the impairment(s) limit a client’s functioning must be consistent with objective medical evidence.
  2. We only use primary diagnoses that produce potentially disabling symptoms or impairments.
    1. Symptoms can be the direct result of the disease or injury, or a result of treatment for the condition.
    2. Some examples of diagnoses that don’t qualify as a potentially disabling impairment are:
      1. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD);
      2. Learning disorders;
      3. Hypertension;
      4. Hepatitis;
        1. Hepatitis is typically asymptomatic or produces mild symptoms. If the disease has progressed, interferon treatment could result in significant fatigue, but may not meet the duration requirement for disability.
      5. Bereavement
        1. While the severity may be temporarily disabling, it is not reasonable to expect the condition to last for 12 months or more.
    3. Pain cannot be used as a diagnosis.
    4. Once a diagnosis has been established by an “acceptable medical source,” written evidence from treating professionals or non-medical sources can be used to determine how the impairment affects the client’s ability to function.
EXAMPLE: Milly has a diagnosis of degenerative disc disease from a physician. Milly’s MRI indicates moderate stenosis. Milly provides a letter from their daughter describing how Milly complains of a tingling sensation in their hands, and that Milly has recently dropped objects that weigh more than 10 lbs. Since Milly has a medically determinable impairment that could result in the symptoms described, the daughter’s statements can be used to help determine the severity of Milly’s impairments and level of exertion.
EXAMPLE: Bart states that pain in their knee keeps them from working. The physician who examined Bart found mild edema, but no crepitus, or other abnormal findings. Bart’s gait and station were noted within normal limits (WNL). Bart also provided a statement from a physician assistant (PA) which stated Bart was limited to sedentary work due to knee pain. Since Bart does not have a medically determinable impairment, the statement from the PA can’t be used when making a determination of disability.

Disability Determination - Chart Note Examples

Revised December 12, 2011

Example Scenarios

The following tables contain examples of phrases found in chart notes and the corresponding rating:

Bob applies for ABD cash and states knee pain is keeping him from working. Note that radiological findings are not requested or necessary in the scenarios describe below.

Examination findings (chart notes) Effect on work activities Rating

Patient complains of transient knee pain, negative for impact on ADLs, negative for redness, swelling, or signs of deformity. ROM WNL [Range of Motion Within Normal Limits].

No effect on basic work-related activities.

none

Patient complains of recurrent knee pain aggravated by running, persistent kneeling, or other prolonged physical activity. Normal gait, ROM WNL. No crepitus or swelling. Recommend PT [Physical Therapy] if symptoms persist.

No significant effect on basic work-related activities.

mild

Patient complains of chronic knee pain aggravated by climbing stairs, kneeling, walking. Has decreased physical activity over the last few months with no relief. Limp observed, knee appears swollen, ROM achieved with audible clicking noise from joint. Recommend follow up treatment with Ortho.

Limits on basic work-related activities.

moderate

Patient ambulates with cane prescribed by PCP prior to losing medical insurance. Unable to get off exam table without assistance. Knee exam significant for swelling, visible scars from prior surgery, lateral laxity, and significantly reduced ROM. States Orthopedist recommended another surgery. Referring to Ortho today.

Significant limits on basic work-related activities.

marked

Patient brought to exam in a wheelchair by daughter. Both knees crushed in a car accident in 2009. Surgery improved functioning initially but trauma induced arthritis has progressed to the point patient can no longer walk more than a few feet with assistive devices. Exam positive for redness, swelling, extensive scar tissue and the appearance of bony deformities.

Unable to perform at basic work-related activities.

severe

Tyler applies for ABD cash and states back pain is keeping him from working.

Examination findings (chart notes) Effect on work activities Rating

Patient complains of intermittent back pain after heavy exertion or “sleeping on it wrong.” pain resolves on its own within a day. ROM WNL. Advised patient to begin a moderate exercise program.

No effect on basic work-related activities.

 

Patient complains of frequent back pain aggravated by lifting and standing for extended periods of time. Relieved by NSAIDs ([Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs]and rest. Reduced ROM. Reflexes intact. Negative straight leg raise. No signs of radiculopathy. Mild degenerative changes and disc desiccation at L4 and L5. Referred for physical therapy.

No significant effect on basic work-related activities.

 

Patient reports chronic pain aggravated by lifting, standing, and sitting for prolonged periods. Review of X-ray indicate moderate degenerative disc disease. Negative for weakness, numbness or tingling. Referring to ORTHO and cautioned patient not to do any heavy lifting.

Limits on basic work-related activities.

 

Patient reports weakness and concerned that he keeps dropping things. Positive for reduced sensation in extremities. Review of MRI positive for significant degenerate changes and moderate stenosis. Referring to ORTHO.

Significant limits on basic work-related activities.

 

Patient arrives in wheelchair provided by VA. Has been unable to walk or stand since MVA [motor vehicle accident] last July. Condition is stable. Patient is wanting to find a PCP since he no longer lives near a VA clinic.

Unable to perform at least one basic work-related activity.

 

Amy applies for ABD cash and states she can’t work because she has diabetes.

Examination findings (chart notes) Effect on work activities Rating

Well maintained on oral medication. Negative for vision changes, numbness, tingling, dizziness. All other systems WNL.

No effect on basic work-related activities.

 

Uncontrolled. Non compliant with diet and medication. Negative for retinopathy, numbness, tingling. Counseled patient on importance of diet and medication compliance to avoid significant complications.

No significant effect on basic work-related activities.

 

Insulin dependent. Currently well controlled, Persistent peripheral neuropathy limits the time patient can walk and stand.

Limits on basic work-related activities.

 

Insulin dependent. Well controlled presently. Long term history of non compliance. Advanced retinopathy. May be a candidate for laser surgery. Positive for reduced sensation in extremities.

Significant limits on basic work-related activities.

 

Uncontrolled despite compliance with medication. Hospitalized with ketoacidosis twice this month. Positive for neuropathy in feet and retinopathy.

Unable to perform at least one basic work-related activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: Diagnostic uncertainty in the form of a provisional diagnosis is NOT acceptable for disability determinations. The person must provide evidence of a medically determinable condition.

Disability Determination WAC Index

Created on: 
Oct 21 2014

Disability Determination Process

WAC 388-449-0001 What are the disability requirements for the Aged, Blind, or Disabled (ABD) program?

WAC 388-449-0005 Sequential Evaluation Process Step 1. How does the department decide if you are performing substantial gainful employment?

WAC 388-449-0010 What medical evidence do we consider to determine disability?

WAC 388-449-0015 What medical evidence do I need to provide?

WAC 388-449-0020 How does the department evaluate functional capacity for mental health impairments?

WAC 388-449-0030 How does the department evaluate functional capacity for physical impairments?

WAC 388-449-0035 How does the department assign severity ratings to my impairment?

WAC 388-449-0040 How does the department determine the severity of mental impairments?

WAC 388-449-0045 How does the department determine the severity of physical impairments?

WAC 388-449-0050 How does the department determine the severity of multiple impairments?

WAC 388-449-0060 Sequential Evaluation Process step II - How does the department review medical evidence to determine if I am eligible for benefits?

WAC 388-449-0070 Sequential Evaluation Process step III - How does the department determine if you meet SSA listing of impairments criteria?

WAC 388-449-0080 Sequential Evaluation Process step IV - How does the department evaluate if I am able to perform relevant past work.

WAC 388-449-0100 Sequential Evaluation Process step V - How does the department evaluate if I can perform other work when determining disability?

SSI Application Requirements

WAC 388-449-0150 When does my eligibility for Aged, Blind, or Disabled (ABD) cash benefits end?

WAC 388-449-0200 Am I eligible for cash assistance for the Aged, Blind, or Disabled (ABD) while waiting for Supplemental Security Income (SSI)?

WAC 388-449-0210 What is interim assistance and how do I assign it to the department?

Treatment and Referral Requirements

WAC 388-449-0220 How does alcohol or drug dependence affect my eligibility for the ABD cash and Pregnant Women Assistance programs?

WAC 388-449-0225 Am I required to participate in vocational rehabilitation services if I receive an ABD cash grant?