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Image of Generic thumbnail image of report coverWashington State SBIRT Primary Care Integration: Implementation - JANUARY 2012-AUGUST 2016

Implementation of the Washington State SBIRT Primary Care Integration Program: This report examines clinic experiences with respect to implementation of the Washington State Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment – Primary Care Integration (WASBIRT-PCI) Program. SBIRT is an evidence-based, universal public health approach used to identify, prevent, and reduce substance use disorders. With the goal of expanding SBIRT services, the WASBIRT-PCI Program was implemented in nineteen healthcare facilities in five counties, screening nearly 83,000 patients over the five year period. Among the patients screened, 11 percent were found to be at risk for a substance use disorder or to experience adverse outcomes related to their substance use. Clinics effectively implemented the screening component, however delivery of the SBIRT intervention using a behavioral health specialist (BHS) was met with varying degrees of success depending on the setting: the BHS model appeared to be more successful in emergency department or specialty mental health settings than in primary care.

Report Image of Bringing Recovery into Diverse GroupsBringing Recovery into Diverse Groups through Engagement and Support: Second Annual Report - Preliminary Findings

The BRIDGES program provides evidence-based permanent supportive housing and supported employment services to chronically homeless individuals with substance use or co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders in Snohomish, Pierce and Kitsap counties. This second report about the BRIDGES program describes baseline participant characteristics and services along with self-reported housing, employment and substance use outcomes for the 153 individuals enrolled during the first two years of the program. Six months after enrollment, participants reported improvement in both housing and employment. Just under half (45 percent) of participants reported they were housed after 6 months of program participation, up from 3 percent at program intake. Twenty-three percent of participants were employed at 6-months, up from 10 percent at intake.

Report Image of Cover PlaceholderWashington State Medication Assisted Treatment - Prescription Drug and Opioid Addiction Project: Year One Performance

An Evaluation of the Washington State Medication Assisted Treatment – Prescription Drug and Opioid Addiction - MAT-PDOA Program This report examines the first year of program implementation of the Washington State Medication Assisted Treatment – Prescription Drug and Opioid Addiction - MAT-PDOA Project. The program expands access to integrated MAT with buprenorphine for opioid use disorders in Grays Harbor, King and Thurston counties. In year one, the program successfully expanded MAT services by implementing office-based opioid treatment with buprenorphine in one large, urban safety-net primary care setting and two opioid treatment programs. MAT-PDOA treated 211 patients and 77% of those patients were still enrolled in treatment at the end of year one. At six months after enrollment in treatment, MAT-PDOA patients reported reductions in 30-day alcohol and drug use rates, including signification reductions in opioid use, methamphetamine use, and injection drug use. Patients also reported reductions in adverse outcomes related to opioid use disorder, including improvements in self-reported employment and school enrollment, reductions in inpatient and emergency department utilization, and increases in outpatient service utilization six months after enrollment.

Report image of the ECLIPSE Program The ECLIPSE Program at Childhaven: Short-Term Outcomes for Children Receiving Early Childhood Intervention and Prevention Services

This report analyzes the impact of the Early Childhood Intervention Prevention Services - ECLIPSE program administered by the Department of Early Learning. ECLIPSE serves children ages zero to 5 years old who are at risk of child abuse and neglect and may be experiencing behavioral health issues due to exposure to complex trauma. We found that ECLIPSE served a population of very high risk young children with intensive service needs. ECLIPSE participation led to increased service utilization, most notably in the use of outpatient mental health services for children. In light of the very high risk population served, increased service utilization may indicate that children were having their pre-existing needs met after beginning to receive services at Childhaven. Further study is needed to both understand the longer-term impacts of Childhaven given the short-term impacts on service utilization found in this report, and to determine the extent to which such services are needed statewide.

Report Image of Transitioning Residents from Nursing Homes to Community Living: Impact of Washington State’s Roads to Community Living (RCL) Demonstration on Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports CostsTransitioning Residents from Nursing Homes to Community Living: Impact of Washington State’s Roads to Community Living (RCL) Demonstration on Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports Costs

Roads to Community Living - RCL, which is part of the federally funded “Money Follows the Person - MFP” program, is a demonstration project in Washington State designed to help people with complex, long-term care needs move from institutions back into the community. Under RCL, Medicaid beneficiaries who reside in a nursing facility for at least 90 days receive services to support their transition to a community-based care setting of their choice. This study finds that relative to a matched comparison group, Medicaid savings for the 1,738 RCL treatment group clients were $21.5 million (all funds) from the month of entry into the RCL program through the 24-month follow-up period. Nursing home cost savings more than offset RCL demonstration services costs and the increased use of home- and community-based services by the RCL group.

Report Image of Impacts of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Enhancements for YouthImpacts of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Enhancements for Youth: An Evaluation of Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT-ED) Program

This study describes outcomes of participants in Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination - SAT-ED Program, a SAMHSA-funded program that provided enhanced treatment and recovery services for youth ages 12 to 18 with a diagnosed substance use disorder at two community-based providers between 2013 and 2016. Youth in the program received standardized assessments, evidence-based treatment services (Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach), and recovery support services. In self-reported assessment data, program participants showed substantial improvements between intake and 6-month follow-up including decreased substance use, increased confidence about resisting relapse, and improved school outcomes. Participants also showed promising improvements in administrative data relative to a matched comparison group, but due to small sample sizes, most program effects were not statistically significant. Promising findings included decreased juvenile justice involvement and increased employment rates.

Report Image of Education and Well-Being of Children in Assisted Housing ProgramsEducation and Well-Being of Children in Assisted Housing Programs: Findings from Washington State

This report examined the impacts of moving into Department of Housing and Urban Development - HUD assisted housing on children’s well-being and education outcomes. We used a quasi-experimental longitudinal design to examine outcomes over time for children who entered HUD assisted housing and compared them to the outcomes for children with similar risk factors who did not receive HUD assisted housing. All youth were in households receiving Basic Food or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families - TANF, may have left or entered assisted housing at some later date, and may have received other types of housing assistance not recorded by HUD. We found that moving into HUD assisted housing led to increased residential stability for children and kept youth connected to social services. However, HUD assisted housing did not appear to impact educational outcomes.

Report Image of Impacts of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Enhancements for Youth 2Impacts of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Enhancements for Youth: An Evaluation of Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT-ED) Program

This study describes outcomes of participants in Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination - SAT-ED Program, a SAMHSA-funded program that provided enhanced treatment and recovery services for youth ages 12 to 18 with a diagnosed substance use disorder at two community-based providers between 2013 and 2016. Youth in the program received standardized assessments, evidence-based treatment services (Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach), and recovery support services. In self-reported assessment data, program participants showed substantial improvements between intake and 6-month follow-up including decreased substance use, increased confidence about resisting relapse, and improved school outcomes. Participants also showed promising improvements in administrative data relative to a matched comparison group, but due to small sample sizes, most program effects were not statistically significant. Promising findings included decreased juvenile justice involvement and increased employment rates.

Report Image of Opportunity Youth: Factors that Predict Disengagement from School and Work Among Youth in Washington State

Opportunity Youth: Factors that Predict Disengagement from School and Work Among Youth in Washington State

This report identifies factors that predict whether youth served by the Department of Social and Health Services - DSHS or the Health Care Authority - HCA become disengaged from school and work during late adolescence or young adulthood. Using a predictive modeling event history approach we find that childhood family and social risk factors, including poverty, homelessness, and behavioral health conditions influence the risk of later disengagement. Further, school measures were significantly predictive of disengagement risk, most notably participating in special education or English language learner programs during high school. Youth who experienced homelessness or criminal just

ice involvement in late adolescence or early adulthood, and those who become parents were also at increased risk of disengagement. Finally, our analysis indicated that youth are most at risk of disengagement upon leaving high school (with or without a diploma) and that youth with work experience are much less likely to disengage.

Report Image of Youth Aging Out of Foster CareYouth Aging Out of Foster Care

This report identifies key risk and protective factors associated with criminal justice involvement for youth aging out of foster care. Twenty percent of the 1,365 youth statewide who aged out of foster care between July 2010 and September 2013 experienced an arrest or jail booking in the following year. Youth with a recent arrest or Juvenile Rehabilitation involvement were at increased risk of criminal justice involvement after aging out of care. Other risk factors include a history of running away, substance use disorder treatment need and congregate care placements. Youth placed in extended foster care were less likely to be arrested or jailed after aging out of care. 

 

 

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