Research and Data Analysis

Latest News

Impacts of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Enhancements for Youth: An Evaluation of Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT-ED) ProgramImpacts of Substance Use Disorder Treatment Enhancements for Youth: An Evaluation of Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT-ED) Program

This study describes outcomes of participants in Washington’s Substance Abuse Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT-ED) Program, a SAMHSA-funded program that provided enhanced treatment and recovery services for youth ages 12 to 18 with a diagnosed substance use disorder at two community-based providers between 2013 and 2016. Youth in the program received standardized assessments, evidence-based treatment services (Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach), and recovery support services. In self-reported assessment data, program participants showed substantial improvements between intake and 6-month follow-up including decreased substance use, increased confidence about resisting relapse, and improved school outcomes. Participants also showed promising improvements in administrative data relative to a matched comparison group, but due to small sample sizes, most program effects were not statistically significant. Promising findings included decreased juvenile justice involvement and increased employment rates.

Opportunity Youth: Factors that Predict Disengagement from School and Work Among Youth in Washington State

Opportunity Youth: Factors that Predict Disengagement from School and Work Among Youth in Washington State

This report identifies factors that predict whether youth served by the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) or the Health Care Authority (HCA) become disengaged from school and work during late adolescence or young adulthood. Using a predictive modeling event history approach we find that childhood family and social risk factors, including poverty, homelessness, and behavioral health conditions influence the risk of later disengagement. Further, school measures were significantly predictive of disengagement risk, most notably participating in special education or English language learner programs during high school. Youth who experienced homelessness or criminal just

ice involvement in late adolescence or early adulthood, and those who become parents were also at increased risk of disengagement. Finally, our analysis indicated that youth are most at risk of disengagement upon leaving high school (with or without a diploma) and that youth with work experience are much less likely to disengage.

Youth Aging Out of Foster CareYouth Aging Out of Foster Care

This report identifies key risk and protective factors associated with criminal justice involvement for youth aging out of foster care. Twenty percent of the 1,365 youth statewide who aged out of foster care between July 2010 and September 2013 experienced an arrest or jail booking in the following year. Youth with a recent arrest or Juvenile Rehabilitation involvement were at increased risk of criminal justice involvement after aging out of care. Other risk factors include a history of running away, substance use disorder treatment need and congregate care placements. Youth placed in extended foster care were less likely to be arrested or jailed after aging out of care. 

 

2016 Disability Determination Services (DDS)2016 Disability Determination Services (DDS)

210 clients completed a customer satisfaction survey for Disability Determination Services conducted April 1, 2016 to August 30, 2016. Overall 75% expressed satisfaction with services, and 75% said DDS staff resolved their issues.. 

 

Impacts of Permanent Supportive Housing ServicesImpacts of Permanent Supportive Housing Services:  An Evaluation of the Permanent Options for Recovery-Centered Housing (PORCH) Program

This report examines outcomes for participants of the Permanent Options for Recovery-Centered Housing (PORCH) program. PORCH provides evidence-based Permanent Supportive Housing services to adults with a history of mental illness and housing instability or homelessness at programs in Pierce County and Chelan and Douglas counties. Several key outcomes improved in a positive direction during the 12 month follow-up period. Pierce County PORCH clients experienced fewer new homeless episodes and had fewer days in State Hospitals, relative to their non-enrolled peers. Community psychiatric hospital stays and felony arrests decreased for Chelan-Douglas PORCH participants, relative to their peers. Most participants who remained in the program for at least 12 months were housed at some point after enrollment (94 percent) and reported improvement in quality of life indicators, like daily functioning and psychological distress. Due to the small number of participants, some of the outcomes failed to reach statistical significance. 

 

Veterans Receiving DSHS Services Following Discharge from Military ServiceVeterans Receiving DSHS Services Following Discharge from Military Service

This report describes the characteristics and service needs of Veterans in Washington State who are recent or former Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) or Health Care Authority (HCA) clients. We found that just under half of the 4,286 Veterans discharged from military service to Washington State between January 2013 and June 2014 had DSHS or HCA service histories. Among Veterans with DSHS or HCA service histories, 18 percent enrolled in Medicaid or similar medical coverage and 19 percent received Basic Food assistance at some point in the 12 months after discharge from military service. 

 

Transition to Adulthood: Washington State Foster Youth at Age 17Transition to Adulthood: Washington State Foster Youth at Age 17

This study examined self-reported risk and protective factors and life experiences of the second National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) cohort of 17 year old youth in foster care in Washington State surveyed in 2014-2015. Of 418 eligible youth, 90 percent (378 youth) participated in the survey. The report focuses on the role of close, trusting relationships with adults, and particularly, foster parents in bettering the lives of the foster youth. We found that the youth whose foster parents were their closest most trusted adults (100 youth or 26 percent of all survey participants) were significantly more likely to attend school or have a job, live in stable housing, receive behavioral health treatment, report no barriers to education and rely on more help from their closest adult compared to youth whose closest adults were other people (245 youth or 65 percent of all survey participants). When compared to their peers surveyed in 2011-2012, the youth reported similar or better life experiences: they were significantly more likely to attend regular high school, live in stable housing, and count on more help from the closest adult. They rated DSHS efforts to strengthen their relationship with their closest adults very positively. 

 

What We Do

DSHS Research and Data Analysis Division provides data, analytics, and decision support tools to improve the delivery of services that transform lives. For more information.

 

Contact RDA - Telephone: (360)902-0707

Other ways of contacting RDA.

 

 

 

Sign up today for RDA's Research and Data Newsletter